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ELEC5616: Computer and Network Security (2014 - Semester 1)

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Unit: ELEC5616: Computer and Network Security (6 CP)
Mode: Normal-Day
On Offer: Yes
Level: Postgraduate
Faculty/School: School of Electrical & Information Engineering
Unit Coordinator/s: A/Prof Leong, Philip
Session options: Semester 1
Versions for this Unit:
Site(s) for this Unit: http://www.cryptologic.org/
Campus: Camperdown/Darlington
Pre-Requisites: None.
Brief Handbook Description: This unit examines the basic cryptographic building blocks of security, working through to their applications in authentication, key exchange, secret and public key encryption, digital signatures, protocols and systems. It then considers these applications in the real world, including models for integrity, authentication, electronic cash, viruses, firewalls, electronic voting, risk assessment, secure web browsers and electronic warfare. Practical cryptosystems are analysed with regard to the assumptions with which they were designed, their limitations, failure modes and ultimately why most end up broken.
Assumed Knowledge: A programming language, basic maths.
Lecturer/s: Mr Barrie, Matt
Timetable: ELEC5616 Timetable
Time Commitment:
# Activity Name Hours per Week Sessions per Week Weeks per Semester
1 Lecture 2.00 1 12
2 Tutorial 1.00 1 13
3 Laboratory 2.00 1 13
4 Project Work - own time 2.00 1 8
5 Independent Study 2.00 1 13
T&L Activities: Laboratory: One 2-hour lab working on a project.

Project Work - own time: Students will work in groups of 2 to design and build a software security system/

Independent Study: Self study and independent learning is a key to success in this UoS.

Attributes listed here represent the key course goals (see Course Map tab) designated for this unit. The list below describes how these attributes are developed through practice in the unit. See Learning Outcomes and Assessment tabs for details of how these attributes are assessed.

Attribute Development Method Attribute Developed
Application of knowledge by analysis of current systems, their limitations and failure modes. Different design criteria for security systems are presented and analysed. Students are required to design their own security system in the project work. Design (Level 4)
Gain an understanding of the cryptographic building blocks of security.

Various security systems widely used in real applications are introduced and analysed.
Engineering/IT Specialisation (Level 4)
Master the mathematical and computer science fundamentals of cryptography and security Maths/Science Methods and Tools (Level 4)
Intensive research will be included in the project work and the assignment. Students need to collect comprehensive information from various sources in order to perform well. Information Seeking (Level 3)
Project reports are one of the main assessment elements for the project work. Students need to write concisely, accurately and convincingly. Each team is also required to give a presentation about their project at the end of the semester. Communication (Level 3)
The project work requires students to form groups and manage their progress through the entire project, including conceiving, design, building, testing and demonstrating the project. Project and Team Skills (Level 2)

For explanation of attributes and levels see Engineering & IT Graduate Outcomes Table.

Learning outcomes are the key abilities and knowledge that will be assessed in this unit. They are listed according to the course goal supported by each. See Assessment Tab for details how each outcome is assessed.

Design (Level 4)
1. Ability to compare and contrast practical cryptosystems and the assumptions with which they were designed to determine their failure modes and to design a cryptosystem to a specification
Engineering/IT Specialisation (Level 4)
2. Ability to appraise applicability and value of cryptography in authentication, key exchange, secret and public key encryption, digital signatures, protocols and systems.
Maths/Science Methods and Tools (Level 4)
3. Proficient use of software system knowledge and cryptography in designing and evaluating security schemes.
Information Seeking (Level 3)
4. Ability to undertake inquiry and knowledge development by first identifying the limits of the available information on security systems and then effectively searching and synthesising the information most pertinent.
Communication (Level 3)
5. Ability to write reports and make presentations on the complexity of security system design and its related performance, using clear and accurate terms and a language commensurate with the expected level of understanding by stakeholders.
Project and Team Skills (Level 2)
6. Ability to work in a team, taking up clear roles and responsibilities while drawing on skills and knowledge of other team members in order to deliver specific engineering work.
Assessment Methods:
# Name Group Weight Due Week Outcomes
1 Projects Yes 25.00 Multiple Weeks 1, 4, 5, 6,
2 Quizzes No 2.50 Multiple Weeks 1, 2,
3 Assignments No 22.50 Multiple Weeks 1, 2, 3,
4 Final Exam No 50.00 Exam Period 1, 2, 3,
Assessment Description: Projects: Three project reports plus demo

Assignments: Two assignments

Quizzes: Two quizzes
Grading:
Grade Type Description
Standards Based Assessment Final grades in this unit are awarded at levels of HD for High Distinction, DI (previously D) for Distinction, CR for Credit, PS (previously P) for Pass and FA (previously F) for Fail as defined by University of Sydney Assessment Policy. Details of the Assessment Policy are available on the Policies website at http://sydney.edu.au/policies . Standards for grades in individual assessment tasks and the summative method for obtaining a final mark in the unit will be set out in a marking guide supplied by the unit coordinator.
Policies & Procedures: See the policies page of the faculty website at http://sydney.edu.au/engineering/student-policies/ for information regarding university policies and local provisions and procedures within the Faculty of Engineering and Information Technologies.
Prescribed Text/s: Note: Students are expected to have a personal copy of all books listed.
Online Course Content: http://www.cryptologic.org/
Note on Resources: sci.crypt newsgroup

Security Engineering (Wiley), Ross Anderson, 2001.

Applied Cryptography, 2nd Edition (Wiley), Bruce Schneier, 1996

Firewalls and Internet Security: Repelling the Wily Hacker (Addison-Wesley Professional Computing), W R. Cheswick, S M. Bellovin, 1994

Decrypted Secrets (Springer), F. L. Bauer, 1997

Cracking DES: Secrets of Encryption Research, Wiretap Politics and Chip Design (O’Reilly), Electronic Frontier Foundation, 1998

The Code Breakers: The Comprehensive History of Secret Communication from Ancient Times to the Internet (Schribner), David Kahn, 1996

Practical Unix and Internet Security, S Garfinkel and G Spafford, 2 ed. (O'Reilly), 1996

Professional Java Security, J. Garms, D. Somerfield (Wrox), ISBN: 1-861004-25-7.

TCP/IP Illustrated, Volume 1: The Protocols, W. Richard Stevens 1994

Note that the "Weeks" referred to in this Schedule are those of the official university semester calendar https://web.timetable.usyd.edu.au/calendar.jsp

Week Description
Week 1 Hash Functions
Introduction
Week 2 Symmetric Cyphers, DES
Cyphers
Week 3 Attacks on DES
Key Exchange
Week 4 Introduction to Number Theory
Asymmetric Crypto
Rainbow Tables
Week 5 Authentication
Digital Signatures
Week 6 Crypto Protocols I
Crypto Protocols II
Week 8 E-Commerce Protocols
Week 9 Overview of Network Security
Network Protocols II
Network Protocols I
Week 10 Hardware Security
Software Security
Wireless Security
Week 11 Guest Lecture: Paul "The Duck" Ducklin (Head of Technology, Sophos)
The Politics of Crypto
Quantum Crypto
Week 12 Live Demo!
Modern Multi-stage Malware -- how it works and how to stop it?
Exam Period Assessment Due: Final Exam

Course Relations

The following is a list of courses which have added this Unit to their structure.

Course Year(s) Offered
Master of Engineering (Network) 2012
Master of Engineering (Power) 2011, 2012
Bachelor of Computer Science and Technology (Honours) 2013, 2014
Computer Engineering 2010
Electrical 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
Electrical Engineering / Arts 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Electrical Engineering / Commerce 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Electrical (Bioelectronics) 2011, 2012
Electrical Engineering (Bioelectronics) / Arts 2011, 2012
Electrical Engineering (Bioelectronics) / Science 2011, 2012
Electrical Engineering (Bioelectronics) / Law 2012
Electrical Engineering / Medical Science 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Electrical Engineering / Project Management 2012, 2013, 2014
Electrical Engineering / Science 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Electrical (Computer) 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
Electrical Engineering (Computer) / Arts 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Electrical Engineering (Computer) / Commerce 2012, 2013, 2014, 2011
Electrical Engineering (Computer) / Science 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Electrical Engineering (Computer) / Law 2012, 2013, 2014
Electrical (Power) 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
Electrical Engineering (Power) / Arts 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Electrical Engineering (Power) / Project Management 2012, 2013, 2014
Electrical Engineering (Power) / Science 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Electrical (Telecommunications) 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
Electrical Engineering (Telecommunications) / Science 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Electrical / Arts 2015
Electrical (Computer) / Arts 2015
Electrical (Power) / Arts 2015
Electrical (Telecommunications) / Arts 2015
Software 2015, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Software / Arts 2015
Software Engineering / Arts 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Software Engineering / Commerce 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Software Engineering / Medical Science 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Software Engineering / Project Management 2012, 2013, 2014
Software Engineering / Science 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Telecommunications 2010
Bachelor of Information Technology (Computer Science) 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
Information Technology (Computer Science)/Arts 2012, 2013, 2014
Information Technology (Computer Science) / Commerce 2012, 2013, 2014
Information Technology (Computer Science) / Medical Science 2012, 2013, 2014
Information Technology (Computer Science) / Science 2012, 2013, 2014
Information Technology (Computer Science) / Law 2012, 2013, 2014
Bachelor of Information Technology (Information Systems) 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
Information Technology (Information Systems)/Arts 2012, 2013, 2014
Information Technology (Information Systems) / Commerce 2012, 2013, 2014
Information Technology (Information Systems) / Medical Science 2012, 2013, 2014
Information Technology (Information Systems) / Science 2012, 2013, 2014
Information Technology (Information Systems) / Law 2012, 2013, 2014
Graduate Certificate in Information Technology 2015
Graduate Certificate in Information Technology Management 2015
Graduate Diploma in Information Technology 2015
Graduate Diploma in Information Technology Management 2015
Graduate Certificate in Engineering 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
Graduate Certificate in Information Technology (till 2014) 2012, 2013, 2014
Graduate Diploma in Information Technology (till 2014) 2012, 2013, 2014
Master of Engineering 2013, 2014, 2015
Master of Engineering (Electrical) 2011, 2012
Master of Engineering (Wireless) 2012
Master of Information Technology 2015
Master of Information Technology Management 2015
Master of IT/Master of IT Management 2015
Master of Information Technology (till 2014) 2014
Master of Professional Engineering (Electrical) 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
Master of Professional Engineering (Network) 2010, 2011, 2012
Master of Professional Engineering (Power) 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
Master of Professional Engineering (Software) 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
Master of Professional Engineering (Telecommunications) 2013, 2014, 2015
Computer Engineering / Commerce 2010
Electrical Engineering (Computer) / Medical Science 2011, 2013, 2014
Electrical Engineering (Telecommunications) / Arts 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Electrical Engineering (Telecommunications) / Medical Science 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

Course Goals

This unit contributes to the achievement of the following course goals:

Attribute Practiced Assessed
Design (Level 4) Yes 31.66%
Engineering/IT Specialisation (Level 4) Yes 25.41%
Maths/Science Methods and Tools (Level 4) Yes 24.16%
Information Seeking (Level 3) Yes 6.25%
Communication (Level 3) Yes 6.25%
Professional Conduct (Level 2) No 0%
Project and Team Skills (Level 2) Yes 6.25%

These goals are selected from Engineering & IT Graduate Outcomes Table which defines overall goals for courses where this unit is primarily offered. See Engineering & IT Graduate Outcomes Table for details of the attributes and levels to be developed in the course as a whole. Percentage figures alongside each course goal provide a rough indication of their relative weighting in assessment for this unit. Note that not all goals are necessarily part of assessment. Some may be more about practice activity. See Learning outcomes for details of what is assessed in relation to each goal and Assessment for details of how the outcome is assessed. See Attributes for details of practice provided for each goal.