Note: This unit version is currently under review and is subject to change!

CIVL9201: Structural Mechanics (2019 - Semester 1)

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Unit: CIVL9201: Structural Mechanics (6 CP)
Mode: Normal-Day
On Offer: Yes
Level: Postgraduate
Faculty/School: Civil Engineering
Unit Coordinator/s: A/Prof Wilkinson, Tim
Session options: Semester 1
Versions for this Unit:
Site(s) for this Unit: http://canvas.sydney.edu.au
Campus: Camperdown/Darlington
Pre-Requisites: None.
Brief Handbook Description: The primary objective of this unit is to understand internal actions (forces and moments) in structures (deformable objects) under loads in three key areas: how structures resist external loads by internal actions; the distribution of internal actions within structures; and the deformations, stresses and strains associated with the internal actions. At the end of this unit, students should be able to understand the basic methods of load transfer in structures - tension, compression, bending, shear and torsion (internal actions); apply the equations of equilibrium to determine the distribution of internal actions in a simple structure by drawing BMDs, SFDs, AFDs, and TMDs; understand the significance and methods of calculation of the geometric properties of structural sections (I, Z, S, J, etc.); understand the effect of internal forces and deformations of bodies through the concept and calculation of strains and stresses; appreciate the behaviour of structures by analysing structures without numerical calculations; display a knowledge of basic material properties, combined stresses and failure criteria; and demonstrate their hands-on experience of the behaviour of structural members via experiments and the ability to prepare written reports on those experiments. Emphasis in the assessment scheme will be placed on understanding structural behaviour and solving problems, rather than remembering formulae or performing complex calculations. The course seeks to utilise and improve the generic skills of students, in areas such as problem solving, neat and logical setting out of solutions, report writing, and team work. The syllabus comprises introduction; equilibrium; internal actions: BMDs, SFDs, AFDs, and TMDs; elasticity, stress and strain, and basic material properties; axial forces: tension and compression; elastic bending of beams; shear force and shear stresses in beams; torsion; deflection of beams; pipes and pressure vessels; trusses; material properties, combined stresses and yield criteria; advanced bending; introduction to buckling and instability.
Assumed Knowledge: From Engineering Mechanics, students should be competent in the following areas: The concept of force and momentum equilibrium in two and three dimensions; Drawing free body diagrams; Establishing and solving the equations of equilibrium from the FBD; Setting out solutions logically, clearly and neatly. Students should be competent in certain mathematical skills: Solving algebraic equations; Differentiation and integration (including double integrals); Drawing graphs of polynomials (especially) and other mathematical function; Trigonometry.
Additional Notes: This UoS is only available to students in the MPE degree who do not have a Civil Engineering background.
Lecturer/s: A/Prof Wilkinson, Tim
Tutor/s: The list of tutors will be included in the tutorial timetable information sheet.
Timetable: CIVL9201 Timetable
Time Commitment:
# Activity Name Hours per Week Sessions per Week Weeks per Semester
1 Independent Study 4.00 13
2 Laboratory 2.00 1 1
3 Lecture 3.00 3 13
4 Tutorial 2.00 1 13
T&L Activities: Tutorial: A 2 hour tutorial session is timetabled weekly. A variety of activities will take place during the tutorial sessions, such as discussion of problems, formative assessment tasks, and a laboratory session. The majority of the time in tutorials will be allocated for students to work on the problem questions. Students should attend their allocated tutorial group and room. On some occasions there may be a joint “briefing” for all students in a common location . There will be a compulsory laboratory session during the tutorial in March. Assessable quizzes have been scheduled during some tutorial sessions. Regular attendance and participation in tutorials, and attempting problems before the allocated session, are considered important for successful understanding and performance in this unit of study

Laboratory: Students are required to attend two laboratory sessions during the semester. This gives students the opportunity to experience some structural behaviour at close hand. The results of the experiments will be compared with the theory developed in lectures and tutorials. One session will be a small introduction to material properties (held during a tutorial session) and the second is designed to be “self-serve” and performed without supervision. There will be a compulsory laboratory session during the tutorial in week 2 or 3. The 2nd laboratory session is to be performed at a time of the students’ convenience and should take no more than 2 hours to perform. Written reports will be required on both sessions as part of assessment.

Learning outcomes are the key abilities and knowledge that will be assessed in this unit. They are listed according to the course goal supported by each. See Assessment Tab for details how each outcome is assessed.

Unassigned Outcomes
1. Understand the basic methods of load transfer in structures – tension, compression, bending, shear and torsion.
2. Apply the equations of equilibrium to determine the distribution of internal actions in a simple structure by drawing BMDs, SFDs, AFDs, and TMDs.
3. Understand the significance and be able to calculate the geometric properties of structural sections (I, Z, S, J etc).
4. Understand the effect of internal forces, and deformations of bodies through the concept and calculation of strains and stresses.
5. Appreciate the behaviour of structures by analysing structures without numerical calculations.
6. Display a knowledge of basic material properties, combined stresses and failure criteria.
7. Demonstrate their hands-on experience of the behaviour of structural members via experiments and the ability to prepare written reports on those experiments.
8. Ability to prepare written reports on experiments.
Assessment Methods:
# Name Group Weight Due Week Outcomes
1 Assignment 1 No 5.00 Week 4 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7,
2 Assignment 2 No 5.00 Week 10 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7,
3 Quiz 1 No 6.25 Week 1 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7,
4 Quiz 2 No 6.25 Week 6 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7,
5 Quiz 3 No 6.25 Week 9 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7,
6 Quiz 4 No 6.25 Week 12 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7,
7 Lab Report 1 No 5.00 Week 5 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7,
8 Lab Report 2 No 10.00 Week 13 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7,
9 Final Exam No 50.00 Exam Period 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7,
Assessment Description: Criteria for Passing: In order to achieve a pass in this unit of study, all the following criteria must be satisfied:

• A total mark of at least 50 %.

• Final examination mark of at least 45 %. This hurdle percentage may be reduced by the lecturer based on exact nature of the questions in the exam.

• Assessment mark of at least 45 %. This hurdle percentage may be reduced by the lecturer based on exact nature of the questions in the assessments.

• Satisfactorily complete the laboratory exercises and write acceptable reports.

There may be statistically and educationally defensible methods used when combining the marks from each component to ensure consistency of marking between markers, and alignment of final grades with grade descriptors.

In most cases the responses to special consideration applications are:

• Special consideration for a single quiz: No action will be taken by the lecturer as the other 3 attempted quizzes will be the ones counted.

• Special consideration for multiple quizzes: You will be required to sit a make-up quiz probably within 5 days after the end of the period of consideration.

• Special consideration for the final exam: Replacement exam

• Sick when an assignment is due: Students should not expect that they will be exempted from completing any assignment due to illness. If you are sick, you should not wait to submit an application and wait for the formal decision – the assignment will still need to be submitted after the end of the period of consideration. You should expect that any possible extension equals the period of illness.

Late submissions: The following late penalties apply to assignments and reports:

• Assessment tasks require hard copy submission and will usually be due at the start of your tutorial session. A location for early or late submission will also be available.

• Each day late is a 5% penalty.

• Assessment tasks cannot be accepted (ie a mark of 0 will be awarded) after the earlier of (the return of marked assignments) or (the release of solutions and/or feedback) or (10 working days). It is anticipated the return/solutions date of the small assignments is 1 week, and lab reports 2 weeks.

Assessment in CIVL9201 is similar to CIVL2201, though masters students in CIVL2201 may be required to do additional questions in some assignments.

Assignment: There will be some “formative assessment” task undertaken during some tutorial sessions. These tasks are not worth marks, but are primarily designed to give both the students and lecturer feedback on level of performance.

Assignment: Students are expected to submit some problems at regular intervals in the form of assignments. The problems will not be marked in detail – they will be checked for the correct procedure and adequate presentation/setting out. A solution will be available, and it is each student’s responsibility to check his/her submission with the solution. The lecturer will attempt to return the submissions within a week to ensure timely feedback to the students. There will be two assignments during the semester. More details on the assignments will be provided on a separate information sheet.

Quiz: There will be 4 short (approximately 1 hour or less) quizzes held during the semester. The main aim of the quizzes is to examine the students’ understanding of the main concepts in the unit of study covered to that date, without excessive calculations. The quizzes will provide feedback to the students on their individual performance, and help the lecturer identify students at risk. Students are permitted to bring some notes and a programmable calculator (exact details will be described by the coordinator during the semester).

Lab Report: Written reports will be required on both laboratory sessions.

Final Exam: There is an examination at the end of the semester. The questions will be of a similar format to the type 1 (basic), type 2 (intermediate), and type 3 (advanced) questions given in the problem sets. The exam questions will require both calculations and explanation-type answers, to test understanding of the subject. The final examination is partial open book. Students are permitted to bring some notes and a programmable calculator (exact details will be described by the coordinator during the semester). No additional written material is permitted in the examination room. More details on the format of the examination will be given in lectures, and the nature of the examination described above is subject to change.
Assessment Feedback: Feedback will be given in the following ways:
* Specific individual written feedback on individual assignments
* Group written general feedback on each assignment
* Group oral feedback in lectures and or tutorials.
Grading:
Grade Type Description
Standards Based Assessment Final grades in this unit are awarded at levels of HD for High Distinction, DI (previously D) for Distinction, CR for Credit, PS (previously P) for Pass and FA (previously F) for Fail as defined by University of Sydney Assessment Policy. Details of the Assessment Policy are available on the Policies website at http://sydney.edu.au/policies . Standards for grades in individual assessment tasks and the summative method for obtaining a final mark in the unit will be set out in a marking guide supplied by the unit coordinator.
Special Conditions to Pass UoS Criteria for Passing: In order to achieve a pass in this unit of study, all the following criteria must be satisfied:

• A total mark of at least 50 %.

• Final examination mark of at least 45 %. This hurdle percentage may be reduced by the lecturer based on exact nature of the questions in the exam.

• Assessment mark of at least 45 %. This hurdle percentage may be reduced by the lecturer based on exact nature of the questions in the assessments.

• Satisfactorily complete the laboratory exercises and write acceptable reports.
Policies & Procedures: See the policies page of the faculty website at https://canvas.sydney.edu.au/courses/2806/pages/feit-faculty-policies-and-procedures for information regarding university policies and local provisions and procedures within the Faculty of Engineering and Information Technologies.
Prescribed Text/s: Note: Students are expected to have a personal copy of all books listed.
Recommended Reference/s: Note: References are provided for guidance purposes only. Students are advised to consult these books in the university library. Purchase is not required.
Online Course Content: Canvas: http://canvas.sydney.edu.au

Note that the "Weeks" referred to in this Schedule are those of the official university semester calendar https://web.timetable.usyd.edu.au/calendar.jsp

Week Description
Week 1 Introduction
Assessment Due: Quiz 1
Week 2 Internal Actions
Week 3 Internal Actions/Stress and Strain
Week 4 Stress and Strain/Axial Force
Assessment Due: Assignment 1
Week 5 Elastic Bending
Assessment Due: Lab Report 1
Week 6 Elastic Bending
Assessment Due: Quiz 2
Week 7 Elastic Bending/Shear
Week 8 Torsion/Deflections
Week 9 Deflections
Assessment Due: Quiz 3
Week 10 Deflections/Pipe and Pressure Vessels
Assessment Due: Assignment 2
Week 11 Trusses/Material Properties/Combined Stresses
Week 12 Combined Stresses/Yield Criteria/Buckling
Assessment Due: Quiz 4
Week 13 Advanced Bending/Review
Assessment Due: Lab Report 2
Exam Period Assessment Due: Final Exam

Course Relations

The following is a list of courses which have added this Unit to their structure.

Course Year(s) Offered
Master of Professional Engineering (Civil) 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020
Master of Professional Engineering (Fluids) 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020
Master of Professional Engineering (Geomechanical) 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020
Master of Professional Engineering (Structural) 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020

Course Goals

This unit contributes to the achievement of the following course goals:

Attribute Practiced Assessed
(8) Professional Effectiveness and Ethical Conduct (Level 3) No 0%
(6) Communication and Inquiry/ Research (Level 3) No 0%
(1) Maths/ Science Methods and Tools (Level 4) No 0%

These goals are selected from Engineering & IT Graduate Outcomes Table 2018 which defines overall goals for courses where this unit is primarily offered. See Engineering & IT Graduate Outcomes Table 2018 for details of the attributes and levels to be developed in the course as a whole. Percentage figures alongside each course goal provide a rough indication of their relative weighting in assessment for this unit. Note that not all goals are necessarily part of assessment. Some may be more about practice activity. See Learning outcomes for details of what is assessed in relation to each goal and Assessment for details of how the outcome is assessed. See Attributes for details of practice provided for each goal.