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CIVL9310: Humanitarian Engineering (2019 - Semester 1)

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Unit: CIVL9310: Humanitarian Engineering (6 CP)
Mode: Normal-Day
On Offer: Yes
Level: Postgraduate
Faculty/School: School of Civil Engineering
Unit Coordinator/s: Dr Thomas, Jacqueline
Session options: Semester 1
Versions for this Unit:
Site(s) for this Unit:
Campus: Camperdown/Darlington
Pre-Requisites: None.
Brief Handbook Description: Humanitarian Engineering is the application of engineering to meet the needs of communities globally; while maintaining a focus on sustainability and appropriateness. This unit will give an introduction to engineers from all disciplines about the unique skills and knowledge needed to tackle challenges in; developing countries, during all stages of disasters and indigenous communities. Achieving global sustainability is a consistent theme through-out the subject. The unit will develop skills in intra-disciplinary teamwork and cross-cultural competence. The subject is taught through a series of lectures based on real case studies and engaging guest seminars. Seminars presenters are all people who are currently working in the field of humanitarian engineering with representatives from industry, government, multi-lateral organisations and non-government organisations. This unit of study is the first lecture based subject in the Humanitarian Engineering major. The unit aligns as a 3rd year elective and is a prerequisite for 4th year subject in the Humanitarian Engineering major CIVL5320 Engineering for Sustainable Development.
Assumed Knowledge: None.
Timetable: CIVL9310 Timetable
Time Commitment:
# Activity Name Hours per Week Sessions per Week Weeks per Semester
1 Lecture 2.00 2 13
2 Tutorial 2.00 1 13
3 Workshop 2.00 1 6

Attributes listed here represent the key course goals (see Course Map tab) designated for this unit. The list below describes how these attributes are developed through practice in the unit. See Learning Outcomes and Assessment tabs for details of how these attributes are assessed.

Attribute Development Method Attribute Developed
On successful completion of this unit, a student should be able to: define humanitarian engineering, describe why the work is complex, state who all the stakeholders are and present the benefits of working in the sector. This will be achieved through case-study based lecturing and workshops provided by industry professionals. (6) Communication and Inquiry/ Research (Level 4)
On successful completion of this unit, a student should be able to work effectively in small teams on a humanitarian engineering problem, understand the different engineering disciplines contributions and demonstrate effective cross-cultural communication. This will be achieved through a team-based disaster refugee camp planning exercise. (7) Project and Team Skills (Level 3)
On successful completion of this unit, a student should be able to explain the professional requirements for humanitarian engineers, refer to ethical codes of conducts and analyse factors for project success and failure. This will be achieved through study of the professional standards and case study examples (8) Professional Effectiveness and Ethical Conduct (Level 3)

For explanation of attributes and levels see Engineering & IT Graduate Outcomes Table 2018.

Learning outcomes are the key abilities and knowledge that will be assessed in this unit. They are listed according to the course goal supported by each. See Assessment Tab for details how each outcome is assessed.

(8) Professional Effectiveness and Ethical Conduct (Level 3)
1. Explain the professional roles and ethical considerations of engineers working in the context of humanitarian engineering (developing countries, disasters and remote areas)
(7) Project and Team Skills (Level 3)
2. Demonstrate the ability to work in a small team with different engineering disciplines to solve an engineering challenge.
(6) Communication and Inquiry/ Research (Level 4)
3. Use analytical and evaluation skills to present the theoretical and practical considerations for project success and failure in humanitarian engineering
Assessment Methods:
# Name Group Weight Due Week Outcomes
1 Tutorial Participation No 10.00 Multiple Weeks 1, 2, 3,
2 Individual Presentation on SDGs No 10.00 Week 3 1, 3,
3 Interview Report No 15.00 Week 7 1, 3,
4 Disaster Planning Refugee Camp Report No 10.00 Week 10 1, 2, 3,
5 Disaster Planning Refugee Camp Model Yes 10.00 Week 10 1, 2, 3,
6 Decentralized technologys report No 15.00 Week 12 1, 3,
7 Final Exam No 30.00 Exam Period 1, 3,
Assessment Description: Task 1. Individually present for 3 minutes on a chosen Sustainable Development Goal, its importance and the role of engineers. The individual performance will be marked by grading by peers. Presentations will be held in Week 3 (10 % of mark).

Task 2. Tutorial participation will be assessed each week over the semester. Preparation, engagement and participation in the tutorial will be assessed (10 % of mark).

Task 3. Individually, students conducted a structured interview with a person who has lived in a developing country. That can either be from birth or during work. The interview will draw out the positives and negatives as well as the role of engineering and IT in development. Interview reports will be due in Week 7 during tutorials (15 % of mark).

Task 4. In assigned intra-discipline engineering groups of three people, the team is to use the Sphere Handbook standards to design a refugee camp for a given scenario. The team will present their design in the as a joint report. The reports will be due in Week 10 (10 % of mark).

Task 5. In the same teams as Task 4, the team is to use the Sphere Handbook standards to design a refugee camp for a given scenario. The team will then use a model to present their design in the tutorials as a presentation. The reports will be due in Week 10 (10 % of mark).

Task 6. Individually students will research decentralized technologies and select a technology that will beneficial to remote communities. Students will then present their chosen technology during the tutorials as well as handing in a brief report. The assignment is to be submitted in Week 12 (15 % of mark).

Task 7. During exams students will sit a closed book exam which will assess the knowledge of the concepts that were taught (including guest seminar content). The questions will be mix of multiple choice, short and long answer (30 % of mark).
Grading:
Grade Type Description
Standards Based Assessment Final grades in this unit are awarded at levels of HD for High Distinction, DI (previously D) for Distinction, CR for Credit, PS (previously P) for Pass and FA (previously F) for Fail as defined by University of Sydney Assessment Policy. Details of the Assessment Policy are available on the Policies website at http://sydney.edu.au/policies . Standards for grades in individual assessment tasks and the summative method for obtaining a final mark in the unit will be set out in a marking guide supplied by the unit coordinator.
Policies & Procedures: See the policies page of the faculty website at http://sydney.edu.au/engineering/student-policies/ for information regarding university policies and local provisions and procedures within the Faculty of Engineering and Information Technologies.
Online Course Content: Canvas contains the course information and more information on the HE major can be found here: bit.ly/USyd_HE

Note that the "Weeks" referred to in this Schedule are those of the official university semester calendar https://web.timetable.usyd.edu.au/calendar.jsp

Week Description
Week 3 Assessment Due: Individual Presentation on SDGs
Week 7 Assessment Due: Interview Report
Week 10 Assessment Due: Disaster Planning Refugee Camp Report
Assessment Due: Disaster Planning Refugee Camp Model
Week 12 Assessment Due: Decentralized technologys report
Exam Period Assessment Due: Final Exam

Course Relations

The following is a list of courses which have added this Unit to their structure.

Course Year(s) Offered
Master of Professional Engineering (Accelerated) (Civil) 2019, 2020
Master of Professional Engineering (Civil) 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020
Master of Professional Engineering (Fluids) 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020
Master of Professional Engineering (Geomechanical) 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020
Master of Professional Engineering (Structural) 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020

Course Goals

This unit contributes to the achievement of the following course goals:

Attribute Practiced Assessed
(8) Professional Effectiveness and Ethical Conduct (Level 3) Yes 41.5%
(7) Project and Team Skills (Level 3) Yes 17%
(6) Communication and Inquiry/ Research (Level 4) Yes 41.5%

These goals are selected from Engineering & IT Graduate Outcomes Table 2018 which defines overall goals for courses where this unit is primarily offered. See Engineering & IT Graduate Outcomes Table 2018 for details of the attributes and levels to be developed in the course as a whole. Percentage figures alongside each course goal provide a rough indication of their relative weighting in assessment for this unit. Note that not all goals are necessarily part of assessment. Some may be more about practice activity. See Learning outcomes for details of what is assessed in relation to each goal and Assessment for details of how the outcome is assessed. See Attributes for details of practice provided for each goal.