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ENGG1960: Introduction to Biomedical Engineering (2015 - Semester 1)

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Unit: ENGG1960: Introduction to Biomedical Engineering (6 CP)
Mode: Normal-Day
On Offer: Yes
Level: Junior
Faculty/School: Faculty of Engineering
Unit Coordinator/s: Dr Boughton, Philip
Session options: Semester 1
Versions for this Unit:
Site(s) for this Unit:
Campus: Camperdown/Darlington
Pre-Requisites: None.
Brief Handbook Description: The purpose of this unit of study is to introduce students to the fundamentals of their chosen discipline: biomedical engineering. This involves lectures on the the medical device technology and key industry players in the medical device industry, fundamental human biology, engineering mechanics with a focus on the biomechanics of the human body, and the basics of biomedical design through engineering drawing. As well as this there will be a segment on introduction to the 5 majors for the BE Biomedical degree: Mechanical, Mechatronic, Chemical, Electrical, and IT. This will be achieved as follows:

1. Lectures introducing the various Biomedical Technologies in the global market, and under development, as well as the Biomedical Engineering Industry itself. This will help answer the questions "what is biomedical engineering and what are the job opportunities?"

2. Weekly lectures on the fundamentals of human biology and the key anatomical systems relevant to biomedical engineering to prepare students for MECH2901 Anatomy and Physiology for Engineers.

3. Weekly lectures and tutorial on engineering mechanics with a biomechanics and biomedical design focus to give students a good grounding in biomechanics which will serve as a fundamental knowledge for intermediate units in the field (Mechanical, Mechatronics majors) and to give all students a useful working grasp of engineering mechanics, the basis of biomechanics, as a pre-requisite for the senior core unit MECH4961 Biomechanics and Biomaterials (Chemical, IT, Electrical majors, and combined degree students).

4. Weekly lectures introducing the 5 BE Biomedical Majors: Mechanical, Mechatronic, Chemical, Electrical, and IT

5. Introductory lectures and computer tutorials on engineering drawing and design, which will serve as a fundamental knowledge for intermediate units in the field and to give students a useful working grasp of engineering drawing and design essential for all practising engineers (Chemical, IT, Electrical majors, and combined degree students) and as a pre-requisite for the senior core unit MECH3660 Manufacturing Engineering.

Strand 1: Introduction to Biomedical Engineering. This strand will comprise 8 hours of lectures in weeks 1 and 2. The purpose is to develop for students an understanding of what Biomedical Engineering is, the range of medical devices and device manufacturers in the market today, an overview of biotechnology, and the key companies both local and multinational in the field. At the end of this component, students will have a clear understanding of what biomedical engineering is, current medical device technology on the market and the key manufacturers of these devices, and the biotechnology industry in terms of processes, products, and key companies involved.

Strand 2: Introduction to Human Biology. This strand will comprise 13 hours of lectures as a weekly 1 hour lecture from week 1 to 13. It will provide an introduction to human anatomy and physiology. The first part of the strand involves a theoretical overview of cell and tissue structures. The second part of the strand gives a theoretical overview of specific relevant anatomical systems for biomedical engineers. Support and Movement: skeletal system and muscular system. Control Systems: nervous system. Regulation and Maintenance: cardiovascular system.

Strand 3: Biomechanics. This strand will comprise a weekly 2 hour lecture from weeks 3 to 9, and a 2 hour tutorial from weeks 3 to 9. The strand aims to provide students with an understanding of and competence in solving statics problems in engineering with a biomechanics focus. Tutorial sessions will help students to improve their group work and problem solving skills, and gain competency in extracting a simplified version of a problem from a complex situation. Emphasis is placed on the ability to engage with real-world biomechanics, including visualization of structures and components, and vectorial representations of spatial points, forces and moments.

Strand 4: Introduction to the BE Biomedical Majors: Mechanical, Mechatronic, Chemical, Electrical, and IT. This strand will involve 8 hours of lectures in weeks 10-13

Strand 5: Biomedical design: Introduction to engineering design and drawing. This strand also involve 8 hours of lectures on Engineering Drawing in weeks 10-13 and CAD (computer-aided-design) supplemented by laboratories working on actual CAD designs.
Assumed Knowledge: HSC Mathematics Extension 1 (3 Unit)
Lecturer/s: Mr Briozzo, Paul
Dr Boughton, Philip
A/Prof Dunstan, Colin
Professor Ruys, Andrew
Tutor/s: Engineering Drawing Demonstrators: Lok, Peter; Mehzabeen, Kazi; Houang, Jessica

Engineering Mechanics Tutors: Kolos, Liz; Chow, Benjamin; Chan, Annabelle, Kwarcinski, Jeremy
Timetable: ENGG1960 Timetable
Time Commitment:
# Activity Name Hours per Week Sessions per Week Weeks per Semester
1 Lectures 3.00 2 13
2 Lecture 2.00 1 2
3 Tutorial 2.00 1 11
4 Independent Study 5.00
T&L Activities: Week 1

4 hours Biomedical Industry Overview lectures (Andrew Ruys)

1 hour Human Biology Lecture (Colin Dunstan)

Week 2

4 hours Biomedical Industry Overview lectures (Andrew Ruys)

1 hour Human Biology Lecture (Colin Dunstan)

Weeks 3 to 9

2x1 hour Biomechanics Lectures (Philip Boughton)

2x1 hour Biomechanics Tutorial (Boughton and 3 Tutors)

1 hour Human Biology Lecture (Colin Dunstan)

Weeks 11-13

2x1 hour lectures on introduction to the BE Biomedical majors: Mechanical, Mechatronic, Chemical, Electrical, IT (Prof Ruys and guest lecturers)

2x1 hour engineering design and biomedical design lectures (Dr Briozzo)

1 hour Engineering Drawing Laboratory (Briozzo and 2 Tutors)

1 hour Human Biology Lecture (Colin Dunstan)

Attributes listed here represent the key course goals (see Course Map tab) designated for this unit. The list below describes how these attributes are developed through practice in the unit. See Learning Outcomes and Assessment tabs for details of how these attributes are assessed.

Attribute Development Method Attribute Developed
Lectures and tutorials: ability to extract a simplified version of a problem from a complex situation is developed. Tutorials: Basic techniques in engineering drawing. Design (Level 1)
Lectures: understanding of current medical device technology and industry, current biotechnology industry, basic cell and tissue structures and key anatomical systems. Engineering/IT Specialisation (Level 1)
Tutorials: basic proficiency in solving statics problems in engineering; basic proficiency in constructing visual representations of structures and structural components in 2D and 3D. Maths/Science Methods and Tools (Level 1)
Basic report writing. Communication (Level 1)

For explanation of attributes and levels see Engineering & IT Graduate Outcomes Table.

Learning outcomes are the key abilities and knowledge that will be assessed in this unit. They are listed according to the course goal supported by each. See Assessment Tab for details how each outcome is assessed.

Engineering/IT Specialisation (Level 1)
1. An understanding of what Biomedical Engineering is, the range of medical devices and device manufacturers in the market today, an overview of biotechnology, and the key companies both local and multinational in the field.
2. Understanding of basic cell and tissue structures.
3. Understanding of key anatomical systems for medical device applications: (1) Support and Movement, skeletal system and muscular system; (2) Control Systems, nervous system; (3) Regulation and maintenance; Cardiovascular system.
Maths/Science Methods and Tools (Level 1)
4. Be able to draw a correct free body diagram for any engineering entity.
5. Be able to calculate the value of unknown forces and moments acting on any three dimensional object from the equilibrium equations.
6. Be able to calculate the force in an internal member of a simple structure.
7. Be able to calculate the forces acting as a result of two objects in contact.
8. Be able to find the centre of mass or centroid of an object.
9. Be able to calculate reaction forces under action of distributed forces for different structures.
Design (Level 1)
10. Develop basic skills in 3D representations in engineering drawing.
Assessment Methods:
# Name Group Weight Due Week Outcomes
1 Biomechanics Quiz 1 No 10.00 Week 5 4, 5, 6,
2 Human Biology Quiz No 10.00 Week 6 2, 3,
3 Engineering Drawing Assignment No 5.00 Week 13 10,
4 Biomechanics Quiz 2 No 10.00 Week 7 4, 7, 8, 9, 10,
5 Biomechanics Quiz 3 No 10.00 Week 9 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9,
6 Team Project Report Yes 10.00 Week 11 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9,
7 Team Seminar Yes 10.00 Week 11 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9,
8 Final Exam No 35.00 Exam Period 1, 2, 3, 10,
Assessment Description: Engineering Mechanics has 3 quizzes, each worth 10%, and each examining the lecture material in the period preceding the quiz. Human biology has one quiz in mid semester worth 10%, exmaining the lecture material preceding the quiz.

All students will submit an engineering drawing assignment in week 13 based on the drawing laboratory work of the preceding 3 weeks.

All students will be formed in teams in week 4 and will prepare a team report and team seminar on an applied biomechanics project that integrates human biology with engineering mechanics. They will submit a team report (5 pages, single spaced, 12 point arial font) and give a team seminar in the week 9 tutorial.

The final exam is 2 hours long and examines the Biomedial Technology lecture material of weeks 1 and 2 (30%) engineering drawing principles in the lecture material of weeks 11-13 (30%) and human biology lecture material from the whole semester (40%).
Assessment Feedback: Tutorials will be used for feedback on the mechanics quizzes. The human biology quiz feedback will be given in the lecture.
Policies & Procedures: See the policies page of the faculty website at http://sydney.edu.au/engineering/student-policies/ for information regarding university policies and local provisions and procedures within the Faculty of Engineering and Information Technologies.
Prescribed Text/s: Note: Students are expected to have a personal copy of all books listed.
  • Engineering Drawing - Mechanical
  • Engineering Mechanics: Statics. SI Version,
  • Fundamentals of Anatomy & Physiology
Online Course Content: Biomechanics lecture notes will be available online.
Note on Resources: Biomedical technology lecture notes will be handed out in class.

Note that the "Weeks" referred to in this Schedule are those of the official university semester calendar https://web.timetable.usyd.edu.au/calendar.jsp

Week Description
Week 1 Intro to Biomed technology: Medical Devices, Medical Device Industry.
Human Biology: Chemical basis of life.
Week 2 Human Biology: Structure and function of the cell.
Intro to Biomed technology: Medical Device Industry, Biotechnology Industry.
Week 3 Biomechanics: (1) Introduction, (2) Vectors, Newton's Laws (3) Forces, Moments, (4) Problem Solving.
Human Biology: Structure and function of the cell.
Week 4 Biomechanics: (1) Force systems, (2) Moments and Couples
Human Biology: Tissue types.
Week 5 Biomechanics: Force Systems Resultants
Human Biology: Tissue types.
Assessment Due: Biomechanics Quiz 1
Week 6 Human Biology: Tissue types.
Biomechanics: Equilibrium
Assessment Due: Human Biology Quiz
Week 7 Human Biology: Skeletal and muscular systems.
Biomechanics: Structures - Methods of Joints & Sections
Assessment Due: Biomechanics Quiz 2
Week 8 Biomechanics: Structures - Trusses / Machines
Human Biology: Skeletal and muscular systems.
Week 9 Human Biology: Skeletal and muscular systems.
Biomechanics: (1) Centre of Mass and Centroids, (2) Friction
Assessment Due: Biomechanics Quiz 3
Week 10 Introduction to the Majors: Electrical and IT
Biomedical design and engineering drawing Lecture 1 and Tutorial 1
Human Biology: Nervous system.
Week 11 Human Biology: Nervous system.
Biomedical design and engineering drawing Lecture 2 and Tutorial 2
Introduction to the Majors: Mechatronic and Chemical
Assessment Due: Team Project Report
Assessment Due: Team Seminar
Week 12 Introduction to the Majors: Mechanical and Overview
Biomedical design and engineering drawing Lecture 3 and Tutorial 3
Human Biology: Cardiovascular system.
Week 13 Biomedical design and engineering drawing Lecture 4 and Tutorial 4
Human Biology: Cardiovascular system.
Assessment Due: Engineering Drawing Assignment
Exam Period Assessment Due: Final Exam

Course Relations

The following is a list of courses which have added this Unit to their structure.

Course Year(s) Offered
Biomedical Engineering / Law 2013, 2014
Biomedical Engineering / Arts 2013, 2014
Biomedical Engineering / Commerce 2013, 2014
Biomedical Engineering / Medical Science 2013, 2014
Biomedical Engineering / Project Management 2013, 2014
Biomedical Engineering / Science 2013, 2014
Biomedical - Chemical and Biomolecular Major 2013, 2014, 2015
Biomedical - Electrical Major 2013, 2014
Biomedical - Information Technology Major 2013, 2014, 2015
Biomedical - Mechanical Major 2013, 2014, 2015
Biomedical - Mechatronics Major 2013, 2014, 2015
Biomedical / Arts 2015
Biomedical / Commerce 2015
Biomedical / Medical Science 2015
Biomedical / Project Management 2015
Biomedical /Science 2015
Biomedical - Electrical Major 2015
Biomedical / Law 2015

Course Goals

This unit contributes to the achievement of the following course goals:

Attribute Practiced Assessed
Engineering/IT Specialisation (Level 1) Yes 38.5%
Maths/Science Methods and Tools (Level 1) Yes 44%
Design (Level 1) Yes 17.5%
Communication (Level 1) Yes 0%

These goals are selected from Engineering & IT Graduate Outcomes Table which defines overall goals for courses where this unit is primarily offered. See Engineering & IT Graduate Outcomes Table for details of the attributes and levels to be developed in the course as a whole. Percentage figures alongside each course goal provide a rough indication of their relative weighting in assessment for this unit. Note that not all goals are necessarily part of assessment. Some may be more about practice activity. See Learning outcomes for details of what is assessed in relation to each goal and Assessment for details of how the outcome is assessed. See Attributes for details of practice provided for each goal.