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GEOL1501: Engineering Geology I (2019 - Semester 2)

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Unit: GEOL1501: Engineering Geology 1 (6 CP)
Mode: Normal-Day
On Offer: Yes
Level: Junior
Faculty/School: School of Geosciences
Unit Coordinator/s: Dr Hubble, Tom
Session options: Semester 2
Versions for this Unit:
Campus: Camperdown/Darlington
Pre-Requisites: None.
Prohibitions: GEOL1002, GEOL1902, GEOS1003, GEOS1903
Brief Handbook Description: Course objectives: To introduce basic geology and the principles of site investigation to civil engineering students. Expected outcomes: Students should develop an appreciation of geologic processes and their influence civil engineering works, acquire knowledge of the most important rocks and minerals and be able to identify them, and interpret geological maps with an emphasis on making construction decisions. Syllabus summary: Geological concepts relevant to civil engineering and the building environment. Introduction to minerals; igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks, their occurrence, formation and significance. General introduction to physical geology and geomorphology, structural geology, plate tectonics, and hydrogeology. Associated laboratory work on minerals, rocks and mapping.
Assumed Knowledge: No previous knowledge of Geology assumed
Timetable: GEOL1501 Timetable
T&L Activities: Lectures: 39 hours lectures, 26 hours laboratory. Field excursions in the Sydney region, as appropriate.

Practical Work:

Learning outcomes are the key abilities and knowledge that will be assessed in this unit. They are listed according to the course goal supported by each. See Assessment Tab for details how each outcome is assessed.

(1) Maths/ Science Methods and Tools (Level 1)
1. an understanding of the concepts and language of modern geosciences
2. an understanding of the processes shaping the Earth's chemical and physical features
3. basic skills in computing, numeracy and data handling
4. a team approach both to scientific investigation and the process of learning
5. a sense of responsibility and independence as a learner and a future scientist
6. enhanced skills in written, oral and interpersonal communication
7. the capacity to find and analyse information
Assessment Methods:
# Name Group Weight Due Week Outcomes
1 Take-home Assignment 1 No 2.50 Week 5 1, 2, 3, 7,
2 Take-home Assignment 2 No 2.50 Week 10 1, 2, 6,
3 `Design & Construct` Group Project Yes 15.00 Week 12 1, 2, 4, 5, 6,
4 Rock Identification Quiz No 10.00 Week 13 1,
5 Weekly Online Assessments No 5.00 Multiple Weeks 1, 2,
6 Final Exam (theory and map interpretation) No 65.00 Exam Period 1, 2,
Assessment Description: Group Project. A group consisting of you and several colleagues are required to design and “construct” a model of the critical, above-ground, structural elements of a major building that will be sited in one of Sydney’s many suburbs. Your building will require an appropriate earthquake damage protection system or strategy depending on the design requirements and characteristics and use of the building (e.g. public/private; critical infrastructure, private residential, industrial, manufacturing).You will receive the commission by way of a sealed envelope in week three. You may select your team during the first two weeks of semester and submit their names to the course coordinator by email or in person at the beginning of sixth lecture (ie. 1pm, Wednesday the 1st of August). Students who have not joined a group by this time will be assigned to a group with the group selection being made by the unit of study coordinator according to (randomized) alphabetical order (i.e. names will be drawn out of a hat).

Group progress will be assessed at two stages: STAGE A) week 8 Submission of preliminary report and design sketch; and STAGE B) week 12 final report submission and model testing. Groups will be required to include evidence of meetings, decisions and the project management decisions.

NOTE WELL: group members may be required to assess the quality of their own contribution, as well as the quality of the contributions of all the other group members, to the whole project in a secret ballot’. Individual marks for the project may be altered to reflect the group opinion of an individual’s performance.

Online Assessments. A self-assessment website will be progressively updated and improved during the course of the semester. Around one-third of the on-line assessment questions will be taken from these self-assessment questions. The address for the self-assessment website is http://www.webmcq.com.au . The question sets can be found in USYD-ENGGEO1. Use your family name and SID for name and password. Directions for Logging into this site will be emailed to you. The course coordinator is Dr Tom Hubble, Room 456, Madsen Building.

Final Exam (theory and map interpretation). The final examination will contain questions covering the work you did in lectures and practicals. Note that all students will be permitted to bring twenty pages of their own hand-written notes into the final exam. Twenty pages means twenty single A4 sides or 10 double-sided sheets of A4 paper. The exam will be invigilated and no printed or photographs will be permitted by the exam supervisors who will administer the exam.
Note on Resources: Portrait of A Planet by Stephen Marshak, Published by H.H. Norton and Company

And readings provided via Blackboard

Note that the "Weeks" referred to in this Schedule are those of the official university semester calendar https://web.timetable.usyd.edu.au/calendar.jsp

Week Description
Week 5 Assessment Due: Take-home Assignment 1
Week 10 Assessment Due: Take-home Assignment 2
Week 12 Assessment Due: `Design & Construct` Group Project
Week 13 Assessment Due: Rock Identification Quiz
Exam Period Assessment Due: Final Exam (theory and map interpretation)

Course Relations

The following is a list of courses which have added this Unit to their structure.

Course Year(s) Offered
Civil (till 2014) 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Civil Engineering / Arts 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Civil Engineering / Commerce 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Civil Engineering / Design in Architecture 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Civil Engineering / Medical Science 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Civil Engineering / Project Management 2012, 2013, 2014
Civil Engineering / Science 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Civil (Construction Management) (till 2014) 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Civil (Environmental) (till 2014) 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Civil (Geotechnical) (till 2014) 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Civil Engineering / Law 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Civil (Structures) (till 2014) 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Civil/ Project Management 2019, 2020
Civil 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020
Civil / Arts 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020
Civil / Commerce 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020
Civil / Design in Architecture 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020
Civil / Medical Science 2015, 2016, 2017
Civil / Music Studies 2016, 2017
Civil / Project Management 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018
Civil / Science 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020
Civil/Science (Health) 2018, 2019, 2020
Civil (Construction Management) 2015
Civil (Environmental) 2015
Civil (Geotechnical) 2015
Civil / Law 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020
Civil (Structures) 2015
Civil Mid-Year 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020
Civil/Science (Medical Science Stream) 2018, 2019, 2020
Flexible First Year (Stream A) / Commerce 2015, 2014
Master of Professional Engineering (Civil) 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020
Master of Professional Engineering (Fluids) 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020
Master of Professional Engineering (Geomechanical) 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020
Master of Professional Engineering (Structural) 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020
Aeronautical Engineering / Science 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Aeronautical Engineering (Space) / Science 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Biomedical Engineering / Science 2013, 2014
Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering / Science 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Electrical Engineering (Bioelectronics) / Science 2011, 2012
Electrical Engineering / Science 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Electrical Engineering (Computer) / Science 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Electrical Engineering (Power) / Science 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Electrical Engineering (Telecommunications) / Science 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Aeronautical / Science 2015, 2016, 2017
Aeronautical (Space) / Science 2015
Biomedical /Science 2015, 2016, 2017
Chemical & Biomolecular / Science 2015, 2016, 2017
Electrical / Science 2015, 2016, 2017
Electrical (Computer) / Science 2015
Electrical (Power) / Science 2015
Electrical (Telecommunications) / Science 2015
Mechanical / Science 2015, 2016, 2017
Mechanical (Space) / Science 2015
Mechatronic / Science 2015, 2016, 2017
Mechatronic (Space) / Science 2015
Software / Science 2015, 2016, 2017
Mechanical Engineering (Biomedical) / Science 2011, 2012
Mechanical Engineering / Science 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Mechanical Engineering (Space) / Science 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Mechatronic Engineering / Science 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Mechatronic Engineering (Space) / Science 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Software Engineering / Science 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Bachelor of Information Technology/Bachelor of Science 2015
Information Technology (Computer Science) / Science 2012, 2013, 2014
Information Technology (Information Systems) / Science 2012, 2013, 2014
Flexible First Year 2016+ / Science 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020
Flexible First Year Program: STREAM A 2015, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Flexible First Year (Stream A) / Arts 2015, 2014
Flexible First Year (Stream A) / Project Management 2015
Flexible First Year (Stream A) / Science 2015, 2014
Flexible First Year (Stream B) / Science 2012, 2013

Course Goals

This unit contributes to the achievement of the following course goals:

Attribute Practiced Assessed
(1) Maths/ Science Methods and Tools (Level 1) No 100%

These goals are selected from Engineering & IT Graduate Outcomes Table 2018 which defines overall goals for courses where this unit is primarily offered. See Engineering & IT Graduate Outcomes Table 2018 for details of the attributes and levels to be developed in the course as a whole. Percentage figures alongside each course goal provide a rough indication of their relative weighting in assessment for this unit. Note that not all goals are necessarily part of assessment. Some may be more about practice activity. See Learning outcomes for details of what is assessed in relation to each goal and Assessment for details of how the outcome is assessed. See Attributes for details of practice provided for each goal.