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MTRX3700: Mechatronics 3 (2019 - Semester 2)

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Unit: MTRX3700: Mechatronics 3 (6 CP)
Mode: Normal-Day
On Offer: Yes
Level: Senior
Faculty/School: School of Aerospace, Mechanical & Mechatronic Engineering
Unit Coordinator/s: A/Prof Rye, David
Session options: Semester 2
Versions for this Unit:
Site(s) for this Unit: Canvas
Ed discussion forum
Campus: Camperdown/Darlington
Pre-Requisites: MTRX2700.
Prohibitions: MECH4710.
Brief Handbook Description: This unit of study aims to provide experience, confidence and competence in the design and implementation of microprocessor-based products and instruments; to impart a detailed knowledge of the software and hardware architecture of a typical modern microcontroller, and an understanding of the use of these resources in product design; and to provide experience of working in a project team to prototype a realistic product to meet a specification.

At the end of this unit students will understand microprocessor system organisation, and the organisation of multiple and distributed processor systems, special purpose architectures (DSPs etc.) and their application. The student will have a detailed knowledge of the software and hardware architecture of a modern microcontroller. This knowledge will include an in-depth understanding of the relationship between assembly language, high-level language, and the hardware, of the utilisation and interfacing of microcontroller hardware resources, and of the design and development of software comprised of multiple interrupt-driven processes. The student will have the competence to develop prototype microprocessor-based products.

Course content will include single processor systems, multiple and distributed processing systems, special purpose architectures (DSPs etc) and their application; real-time operating systems for microcontrollers; standard interfacing of sensor and actuation systems; ADC/DAC, SSI, parallel, CAN bus etc.; specific requirements for microprocessor-based products; problem definition and system design; tools for design, development and testing of prototype systems; the unit of study will include a project, where groups of students design, develop and commission a microprocessor-based product.
Assumed Knowledge: Completion of a first course in microprocessor systems, including assembly and C language programming, interfacing, introductory digital and analogue electronics.
Lecturer/s: A/Prof Rye, David
Tutor/s: Amrit Sethi, Fletcher Fan, Jasper Brown and Max Revay
Timetable: MTRX3700 Timetable
Time Commitment:
# Activity Name Hours per Week Sessions per Week Weeks per Semester
1 Lecture 2.50 13
2 Laboratory 3.00 1 13
3 Independent Study 5.00 1 13
T&L Activities: Independent Study: You are expected to undertake at least five hours of independent study per week outside of formally timetabled classes. The Mechatronics Laboratory is `open access` outside of formally-timetabled classes.

Learning outcomes are the key abilities and knowledge that will be assessed in this unit. They are listed according to the course goal supported by each. See Assessment Tab for details how each outcome is assessed.

(7) Project and Team Skills (Level 3)
1. Understand and plan for the process of incremental implementation, recognising the importance of project management, teamwork, software/hardware co-design, and iterative development by members of a development team.
(6) Communication and Inquiry/ Research (Level 3)
2. Find electronic components suitable for a particular purpose, and to locate and understanding manufacturers` data sheets.
(4) Design (Level 3)
3. Design and prototype the software and hardware comprising a microcontroller-based system.
4. Reason logically about microcontroller system behaviour to isolate faults, and to use modern development systems and laboratory equipment to debug microcontroller software and hardware problems at the component level.
(2) Engineering/ IT Specialisation (Level 4)
5. Understand in detail the software and hardware architecture of a modern microcontroller, including the relationship between assembly language, high-level language (C) and the hardware, the utilisation and interfacing of microcontroller hardware resources, and the design and development of software incoporating multiple interrupt-driven elements.
6. Understand microprocessor system organization, the organization of multiple and distributed processor systems, special purpose architectures (DSPs etc.) and their applications. Ability to differentiate between CISC, RISC and DSP processors, understanding the reasons for their evolution & adoption in specific designs.
7. Understand and select appropriately between various alternatives for data communications within a mechatronic system.
Assessment Methods:
# Name Group Weight Due Week Outcomes
1 Software Exercises Yes 20.00 Week 7 3, 4, 5,
2 Design Walkthrough Yes 4.00 Week 9 1, 3,
3 Major Project Yes 36.00 Week 13 1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
4 Final Exam No 40.00 Exam Period 2, 3, 5, 6, 7,
Assessment Description: Software Exercises: These are completed in groups of two persons. The small group environment is intended to ensure that all students gain a detailed core of knowledge that will support their work in the Major Project.

Major Project: MTRX3700 Mechatronics 3 is a project-based unit of study. There is strong emphasis placed on understanding the material so that a student can make things work in the lab. Most of the learning will therefore occur in the laboratory, and the assessment weighting of assignment and project work reflects this fact.

Presentation: An oral presentation is required early in the Major Project development cycle. The intent is to simulate a typical step in product development, where a team must rapidly be formed, a large amount of technical data assimilated and key decisions taken, responsibilities allocated, project planning commenced and a preliminary design presented to the client.

Final Exam: The examination is partial-open-book, to encourage deep learning rather than reliance on memory. Students will be able to consult a copy of the PIC18FXX2 Datasheet, which will be supplied.

Moderation of Group Work Marks: Group marks for Lab Work will be moderated on the basis of individual effort and understanding, as perceived by the Lecturer and Tutor(s) and as self-reported by group members.

Late submission of assignments will be penalized 20% of the maximum mark for the assignment per day (or part thereof) that it is late.

Must Pass Both Components: To pass this unit of study it is necessary to obtain a mark of not less than 45% in BOTH the assignment and examination components. If you fail either the assignment component or the exam the maximum mark you can get for the unit of study is 45%.
Assessment Feedback: Students can expect feedback for this Unit of Study through discussion during lectures and laboratory sessions, through participation in the forums on the Ed discussion forum, and through written comments on assignments.

Students can provide feedback to the Lecturers and Tutors by discussion during lectures or tutorial/ laboratory sessions, and by submitting comments and questions to the Ed discussion forum.
Grading:
Grade Type Description
Standards Based Assessment Final grades in this unit are awarded at levels of HD for High Distinction, DI (previously D) for Distinction, CR for Credit, PS (previously P) for Pass and FA (previously F) for Fail as defined by University of Sydney Assessment Policy. Details of the Assessment Policy are available on the Policies website at http://sydney.edu.au/policies . Standards for grades in individual assessment tasks and the summative method for obtaining a final mark in the unit will be set out in a marking guide supplied by the unit coordinator.
Special Conditions to Pass UoS Group marks for Lab Work will be moderated on the basis of individual effort and understanding, as perceived by the Lecturer and Tutor(s). To pass this unit of study it is necessary to obtain a mark of not less than 45% in both the assignment and examination components. Otherwise, the maximum mark that will be awarded is 45%.
Policies & Procedures: See the FEIT Faculty Policies & Procedures page on Canvas at https://canvas.sydney.edu.au/courses/2806/pages/feit-faculty-policies-and-procedures for information regarding University policies and local provisions and procedures within the Faculty of Engineering and Information Technologies.
Prescribed Text/s: Note: Students are expected to have a personal copy of all books listed.
  • Embedded Design with the PIC18F452 Microcontroller
  • PIC18FXX2 Data Sheet
Online Course Content: Canvas

Ed discussion forum

Note that the "Weeks" referred to in this Schedule are those of the official university semester calendar https://web.timetable.usyd.edu.au/calendar.jsp

Week Description
Week 1 Introduction, Hardware Overview, Demonstration
Week 2 8F452 Core Hardware and Instruction Set
Week 3 Instruction Set and Assembler
Week 4 Peripheral Hardware
Week 5 C Compiler, Relocation & Linking. Mixed C and Assembley Language
Week 6 Software Design
Week 7 Real-time Operating Systems
Assessment Due: Software Exercises
Week 8 Hardware Prototyping
Week 9 Memory Hierarchy; Pipelining
Assessment Due: Design Walkthrough
Week 10 Multiprocessor and Multicomputer Systems
Week 11 RISC Processors & DSPs
Week 12 Communications
Week 13 Uncommitted
Assessment Due: Major Project
Exam Period Assessment Due: Final Exam

Course Relations

The following is a list of courses which have added this Unit to their structure.

Course Year(s) Offered
Biomedical - Mechatronics Major 2013, 2014, 2015
Mechatronic Mid-Year 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019
Mechatronic/ Project Management 2019
Mechatronic 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019
Mechatronic / Arts 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019
Mechatronic / Commerce 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019
Mechatronic / Medical Science 2015, 2016, 2017
Mechatronic / Music Studies 2016, 2017
Mechatronic / Project Management 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018
Mechatronic / Science 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019
Mechatronic/Science (Health) 2018, 2019
Mechatronic / Law 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019
Mechatronic (Space) 2015
Mechatronic (Space) / Arts 2015
Mechatronic (Space) / Commerce 2015
Mechatronic (Space) / Medical Science 2015
Mechatronic (Space) / Project Management 2015
Mechatronic (Space) / Science 2015
Mechatronic (Space) / Law 2015
Mechatronic (till 2014) 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Mechatronic Engineering / Arts 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Mechatronic Engineering / Commerce 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Mechatronic Engineering / Medical Science 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Mechatronic Engineering / Project Management 2012, 2013, 2014
Mechatronic Engineering / Science 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Mechatronic (Space) (till 2014) 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Mechatronic Engineering (Space) / Arts 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Mechatronic Engineering (Space) / Commerce 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Mechatronic Engineering (Space) / Medical Science 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Mechatronic Engineering (Space) / Project Management 2012, 2013, 2014
Mechatronic Engineering (Space) / Science 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Mechatronic Engineering (Space) / Law 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Mechatronic/Science (Medical Science Stream) 2018, 2019
Biomedical Mid-Year 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019
Biomedical 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019

Course Goals

This unit contributes to the achievement of the following course goals:

Attribute Practiced Assessed
(7) Project and Team Skills (Level 3) No 11%
(8) Professional Effectiveness and Ethical Conduct (Level 2) No 0%
(6) Communication and Inquiry/ Research (Level 3) No 11.6%
(5) Interdisciplinary, Inclusiveness, Influence (Level 3) No 0%
(3) Problem Solving and Inventiveness (Level 3) No 0%
(4) Design (Level 3) No 40.61%
(2) Engineering/ IT Specialisation (Level 4) No 36.79%

These goals are selected from Engineering & IT Graduate Outcomes Table 2018 which defines overall goals for courses where this unit is primarily offered. See Engineering & IT Graduate Outcomes Table 2018 for details of the attributes and levels to be developed in the course as a whole. Percentage figures alongside each course goal provide a rough indication of their relative weighting in assessment for this unit. Note that not all goals are necessarily part of assessment. Some may be more about practice activity. See Learning outcomes for details of what is assessed in relation to each goal and Assessment for details of how the outcome is assessed. See Attributes for details of practice provided for each goal.