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MECH5720: Sensors and Signals (2019 - Semester 2)

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Unit: MECH5720: Sensors and Signals (6 CP)
Mode: Normal-Day
On Offer: Yes
Level: Postgraduate
Faculty/School: School of Aerospace, Mechanical & Mechatronic Engineering
Unit Coordinator/s: Dr Brooker, Graham
Session options: Semester 2
Versions for this Unit:
Campus: Camperdown/Darlington
Pre-Requisites: MTRX3700.
Prohibitions: MECH4720.
Brief Handbook Description: Syllabus Summary: This course starts by providing a background to the signals and transforms required to understand modern sensors. It goes on to provide an overview of the workings of typical active sensors (Radar, Lidar and Sonar). It provides insight into basic sensing methods as well as aspects of interfacing and signal processing. It includes both background material and a number of case studies.

The course covers the following topics:

a) SIGNALS: Convolution, The Fourier Transform, Modulation (FM, AM, FSK, PSK etc), Frequency shifting (mixing)

b) PASSIVE SENSORS: Infrared Radiometers, Imaging Infrared, Passive Microwave Imaging, Visible Imaging & Image Intensifiers

c) ACTIVE SENSORS THE BASICS: Operational Principles, Time of flight (TOF) Measurement & Imaging of Radar, Lidar and Sonar, Radio Tags and Transponders, Range Tacking, Doppler Measurement, Phase Measurement

d) SENSORS AND THE ENVIRONMENT: Atmospheric Effects, Target Characteristics, Clutter Characteristics, Multipath

e) ACTIVE SENSORS: ADVANCED TECHNIQUES: Probability of Detection, Angle Measurement and Tracking, Combined Range/Doppler and Angle Tracking, Frequency Modulation and the Fast Fourier Transform, High Range Resolution, Wide Aperture Methods, Synthetic Aperture Methods (SAR)

Objectives: The course aims to provide students with a good practical knowledge of a broad range of sensor technologies, operational principles and relevant signal processing techniques.

Expected Outcomes: A good understanding of active sensors, their outputs and applicable signal processing techniques. An appreciation of the basic sensors that are available to engineers and when they should be used.
Assumed Knowledge: Strong MATLAB skills
Lecturer/s: Dr Brooker, Graham
Timetable: MECH5720 Timetable
Time Commitment:
# Activity Name Hours per Week Sessions per Week Weeks per Semester
1 Lecture 2.00 2 12
2 Project Work - own time 2.00 1 8
3 Independent Study 3.00 1 13
4 Laboratory 3.00 1 10
5 Tutorial 1.00 1 10
T&L Activities: Project Work - own time: A design project will be undertaken by groups of students. This will take the form of a log-book prepared by each student during the semester as their knowledge of the subject improves. Towards the end of semester the students will compile a single design report which will be assessed by the lecturer.

Independent Study: Depending on student competence and background, at least three hours of private study per week outside formal contact hours will be required to consolidate the work covered in class

Laboratory: Student groups will assemble and measure the characteristics of various sensors (ultrasound and microwave). They will be provided with some Measure Foundry code, but will be expected to develop additional code

Tutorial: A number of MATLAB tutorials will be undertaken during which students are expected to develop the code to model some sensing or signal processing application

Learning outcomes are the key abilities and knowledge that will be assessed in this unit. They are listed according to the course goal supported by each. See Assessment Tab for details how each outcome is assessed.

(6) Communication and Inquiry/ Research (Level 3)
1. An ability to assimilate information regarding the myriad possibilities for the design of a sensor, and to convey this information to ones colleagues
(7) Project and Team Skills (Level 2)
2. Develop skills for efficient project management in a team environment
(8) Professional Effectiveness and Ethical Conduct (Level 4)
3. Some experience in integrating incomplete information and making value judgements to solve a sensing problem by using engineering "gut feel" rather than a rigorous analytical approach
(4) Design (Level 5)
4. The ability to apply specialised engineering skills (mechanical, electrical and software) to analyse the performance of a sensor
(2) Engineering/ IT Specialisation (Level 4)
5. A good understanding of active sensors, their outputs and applicable signal processing techniques. An appreciation of the basic sensors that are available to engineers and when they should be used.
(1) Maths/ Science Methods and Tools (Level 4)
6. Knowledge to describe a number of sensors
7. The ability to make a distinction between sensor performance based on simulation and that based on measurement
Assessment Methods:
# Name Group Weight Due Week Outcomes
1 Tutorial No 20.00 Multiple Weeks 4, 5, 7,
2 In class quizzes Yes 10.00 Multiple Weeks 1, 4, 5, 6, 7,
3 Laboratory Yes 25.00 Multiple Weeks 3, 4, 5,
4 Assignment No 10.00 Week 10 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7,
5 Final Exam No 35.00 Exam Period 1, 4, 5, 6,
Assessment Description: Matlab Tutorial: A number of hands-on tutorials will be undertaken in which the students are expected to apply and investigate what they have learned by developing models and software. Tutors will grade the individual submissions from students.

In class quizzes: Quizzes will be held at the end of sections to ensure that students have understood the work covered so far. The lecturer will mark these submissions

Lab Activities: Weekly small-group activities will be held in the new Kirby Mtrx lab in which students will be required to assemble sensing, processing and actuation hardware that illustrates some sensing and signal processing concepts. Students will submit a completed worksheet at the end of each lab which will be marked by the lecturer

The culmination of this process will be an informal competition during which the students must develop and test a 2D beacon tracker based on monopulse techniques.

Assignment: The design assignment will take the form of a group assignment based on journals in which the students develop ideas for a sensing device in stages throughout the first half of the semester as their knowledge and understanding of the subject develops. These journals will be used to produce a formal group assignment document which will be graded by the lecturer to determine how well the students have satisfied the requirements specified in the problem statement. This open ended approach to an assignment allows students more scope to be creative, and throughout the course, creativity and an innovative approach will be encouraged.

Final Exam: Open-book examination. Final assessment will include a number of short-answer questions to assess the student’s knowledge of the basic concepts and an analysis section to test their ability to apply these concepts to solve problems. Note that students will be required to pass the exam, to pass the course.

Note that all tutorials, labs and the assignment must be completed by individual students or student groups. Students who fail to submit will receive a mark of 0 for the missed submission. Students who provide accepted special consideration forms will have the weighting of the exam increased commensurate to the value of the missed submission.

Late submissions will be penalised at 5% (of the total value of the assessment) per day, or part thereof. If the submission is more than nine days late it will receive a mark of 0.

The University has authorised and mandated the use of text-based similarity detecting software Turnitin for all text-based written assignments

Irrespective of the average mark based on all the assessments, the student must pass the exam to pass the course.
Assessment Feedback: Marked labs, quizzes, tutorials and assignments will be returned to the students.
If systematic problems are encountered, these will be addressed in class or in the tutorials.
Grading:
Grade Type Description
Standards Based Assessment Final grades in this unit are awarded at levels of HD for High Distinction, DI (previously D) for Distinction, CR for Credit, PS (previously P) for Pass and FA (previously F) for Fail as defined by University of Sydney Assessment Policy. Details of the Assessment Policy are available on the Policies website at http://sydney.edu.au/policies . Standards for grades in individual assessment tasks and the summative method for obtaining a final mark in the unit will be set out in a marking guide supplied by the unit coordinator.
Policies & Procedures: See the policies page of the faculty website at http://sydney.edu.au/engineering/student-policies/ for information regarding university policies and local provisions and procedures within the Faculty of Engineering and Information Technologies.
Prescribed Text/s: Note: Students are expected to have a personal copy of all books listed.
Note on Resources: Lectures etc available on eLearning (webCT)

Note that the "Weeks" referred to in this Schedule are those of the official university semester calendar https://web.timetable.usyd.edu.au/calendar.jsp

Week Description
Week 1 Signal processing and modulation
Week 2 Active ranging sensors
Week 3 Active imaging sensors
Week 4 Signal propagation
Week 5 target detection in noise
Week 6 Target and clutter characteristics
Week 7 Doppler processing
Week 8 High range resolution
Week 9 High angular resolution techniques
Week 10 Range and Angle Estimation
Assessment Due: Assignment
Week 11 Tracking moving targets
Week 12 Radiometry
Week 13 Tomography and 3D imaging
Exam Period Assessment Due: Final Exam

Course Relations

The following is a list of courses which have added this Unit to their structure.

Course Year(s) Offered
Biomedical Engineering / Law 2014
Biomedical Engineering / Arts 2014
Biomedical Engineering / Commerce 2014
Biomedical Engineering / Medical Science 2014
Biomedical Engineering / Project Management 2014
Biomedical Engineering / Science 2014
Biomedical - Chemical and Biomolecular Major 2014, 2015
Biomedical - Electrical Major 2014
Biomedical - Information Technology Major 2014, 2015
Biomedical - Mechanical Major 2014, 2015
Biomedical - Mechatronics Major 2014, 2015
Biomedical Mid-Year 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020
Biomedical/ Project Management 2019, 2020
Biomedical 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020
Biomedical / Arts 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020
Biomedical / Commerce 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020
Biomedical / Medical Science 2015, 2016, 2017
Biomedical / Music Studies 2016, 2017
Biomedical / Project Management 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018
Biomedical /Science 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020
Biomedical/Science (Health) 2018, 2019, 2020
Biomedical - Electrical Major 2015
Biomedical / Law 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020
Mechanical 2015, 2019, 2020
Mechatronic Mid-Year 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020
Mechatronic/ Project Management 2019, 2020
Mechatronic 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020
Mechatronic / Arts 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020
Mechatronic / Commerce 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020
Mechatronic / Medical Science 2015, 2016, 2017
Mechatronic / Music Studies 2016, 2017
Mechatronic / Project Management 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018
Mechatronic / Science 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020
Mechatronic/Science (Health) 2018, 2019, 2020
Mechatronic / Law 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020
Mechatronic (Space) 2015
Mechatronic (Space) / Arts 2015
Mechatronic (Space) / Commerce 2015
Mechatronic (Space) / Medical Science 2015
Mechatronic (Space) / Project Management 2015
Mechatronic (Space) / Science 2015
Mechatronic (Space) / Law 2015
Mechatronic (till 2014) 2014
Mechatronic Engineering / Arts 2014
Mechatronic Engineering / Commerce 2014
Mechatronic Engineering / Medical Science 2014
Mechatronic Engineering / Project Management 2014
Mechatronic Engineering / Science 2014
Mechatronic (Space) (till 2014) 2014
Mechatronic Engineering (Space) / Arts 2014
Mechatronic Engineering (Space) / Commerce 2014
Mechatronic Engineering (Space) / Medical Science 2014
Mechatronic Engineering (Space) / Project Management 2014
Mechatronic Engineering (Space) / Science 2014
Mechatronic Engineering (Space) / Law 2014
Biomedical/Science (Medical Science Stream) 2018, 2019, 2020
Master of Engineering 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020
Master of Engineering (Mechanical) 2011, 2012
Master of Professional Engineering (Accelerated) (Biomedical) 2019, 2020
Master of Professional Engineering (Accelerated) (Mechanical) 2019, 2020
Master of Professional Engineering (Biomedical) 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020
Master of Professional Engineering (Mechanical) 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020
Mechatronic/Science (Medical Science Stream) 2018, 2019, 2020
Aeronautical Mid-Year 2019, 2020
Aeronautical/ Project Management 2019, 2020
Aeronautical 2019, 2020
Aeronautical / Arts 2019, 2020
Aeronautical / Law 2019, 2020
Mechanical Mid-Year 2019, 2020
Mechanical/ Project Management 2019, 2020
Mechanical/Science (Medical Science Stream) 2018, 2019, 2020

Course Goals

This unit contributes to the achievement of the following course goals:

Attribute Practiced Assessed
(6) Communication and Inquiry/ Research (Level 3) No 12.18%
(7) Project and Team Skills (Level 2) No 1.43%
(8) Professional Effectiveness and Ethical Conduct (Level 4) No 3.93%
(5) Interdisciplinary, Inclusiveness, Influence (Level 5) No 0%
(4) Design (Level 5) No 34.68%
(2) Engineering/ IT Specialisation (Level 4) No 27.18%
(3) Problem Solving and Inventiveness (Level 5) No 0%
(1) Maths/ Science Methods and Tools (Level 4) No 20.61%

These goals are selected from Engineering & IT Graduate Outcomes Table 2018 which defines overall goals for courses where this unit is primarily offered. See Engineering & IT Graduate Outcomes Table 2018 for details of the attributes and levels to be developed in the course as a whole. Percentage figures alongside each course goal provide a rough indication of their relative weighting in assessment for this unit. Note that not all goals are necessarily part of assessment. Some may be more about practice activity. See Learning outcomes for details of what is assessed in relation to each goal and Assessment for details of how the outcome is assessed. See Attributes for details of practice provided for each goal.