ENGG5206: Exponential and Emerging Technologies (2021 - Semester 2)

Download UoS Outline

Unit: ENGG5206: Exponential and Emerging Technologies (6 CP)
Mode: Normal-Day
On Offer: Yes
Level: Postgraduate
Faculty/School: School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
Unit Coordinator/s: Dr Harris, Andrew
Session options: Semester 2
Versions for this Unit:
Campus: Camperdown/Darlington
Pre-Requisites: None.
Brief Handbook Description: The pace of technological change has never been greater. Tomorrow’s professional engineer needs to master the core skills of their specialisation, and be able to recognise and eventually master future technologies likely to have a profound impact throughout their working lives and across the ‘future of work’ more broadly.

These technologies are variously known as disruptive, emerging and exponential technologies; defined as those for which performance doubles whilst cost halves in any given period (c.f. Moore’s law), providing opportunities to solve global problems in ways that were not previously believed possible.

This unit of study will introduce students to a broad suite of these exponential and emerging technologies, through a series of keynote lectures (delivered by subject matter experts from across the University and professional practice) as well enable students to experience them first-hand through practical, laboratory and field work engagements. Each year a global scale theme (e.g. energy, poverty, food production, health) will be chosen to consider each of the technologies studied as tools to address the theme, building from week to week as the course progresses.

Example technologies include 3D & 4D printing, automation and augmentation, artificial intelligence, digital twins, cyber security & synthetic biology.
Assumed Knowledge: Minimum 24 credit points 3000 level units
Timetable: ENGG5206 Timetable
Time Commitment:
# Activity Name Hours per Week Sessions per Week Weeks per Semester
1 Keynote Lecture 2.00 1 10
2 Laboratory 4.00 1 10
3 Workgroup 4.00 1 10
T&L Activities: i) One keynote lecture, delivered by a subject matter expert, each week during weeks 1 through 10.

ii) Supporting tutorial/workshop group session each week, during weeks 1 through 10.

iii) Supporting practical session (laboratory/field trip/practical session) on average every two weeks exploring key concepts in more detail, building upon the lecture and tutorial materials.

iv) Own time - Approximately 6 hours per week outside timetabled classes to keep up with assignment and coursework.

Learning outcomes are the key abilities and knowledge that will be assessed in this unit. They are listed according to the course goal supported by each. See Assessment Tab for details how each outcome is assessed.

(2) Engineering/ IT Specialisation (Level 4)
1. i) An appreciation of the underlying principles of exponential engineering and the future of work.

ii) The ability to apply these technologies to new and novel situations.

iii) The ability to critically analyse global scale problems and solve them in new ways, using an exponential technologies toolkit
(7) Project and Team Skills (Level 4)
2. vii) Interpersonal, group and teamwork skills including the ability to communicate clearly and concisely.

viii) Professionalism in terms of taking responsibility for the results of their calculations and recommendations.

ix) Lifetime or self-directed learning skills including the ability to critically assess one’s own performance in a constructive fashion.
(8) Professional Effectiveness and Ethical Conduct (Level 4)
3. viii) Professionalism in terms of taking responsibility for the results of their calculations and recommendations.

ix) Lifetime or self-directed learning skills including the ability to critically assess one’s own performance in a constructive fashion.
(6) Communication and Inquiry/ Research (Level 5)
4. v) An ability to independently research new areas and be critical of what is found.

vi) An ability to cope with experimental data, change and uncertainty through critical thinking.
5. v) An ability to independently research new areas and be critical of what is found.

vi) An ability to cope with experimental data, change and uncertainty through critical thinking.
(5) Interdisciplinary, Inclusiveness, Influence (Level 5)
6. i) An appreciation of the underlying principles of exponential engineering and the future of work.

ii) The ability to apply these technologies to new and novel situations.

iii) The ability to critically analyse global scale problems and solve them in new ways, using an exponential technologies toolkit, building upon the core curriculum in CBE
(3) Problem Solving and Inventiveness (Level 4)
7. iv) The development of an integrated suite of problem-solving skills needed to successfully handle novel (and previously unseen) engineering situations.

v) An ability to independently research new areas and be critical of what is found.

vi) An ability to cope with experimental data, change and uncertainty through critical thinking.
Assessment Methods:
# Name Group Weight Due Week Outcomes
1 Assignment 1 No 10.00 Week 3 (As specified by your unit coordinator, 12 pm) 1,
2 Assignment 2 Yes 20.00 Week 6 (As specified by your unit coordinator, 12 pm) 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7,
3 Assignment 3 Yes 20.00 Week 9 (As specified by your unit coordinator, 12 pm) 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7,
4 Laboratory No 40.00 Week 12 (As specified by your unit coordinator, 12 pm) 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7,
5 Keynote lecture discussion Yes 10.00 Multiple Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7,
Assessment Description: What types of assessments are going to be used in this unit of study?

Students will be assessed upon their performance in a series of written, oral and practical assignments, laboratory sessions and class discussions. For assignments they will work in small groups to solve problems, documenting their work in technical reports and at oral presentation sessions.

How much weighting will each assessment have on the student’s final grade?

Written and verbal assignments – 50%

Laboratory sessions – 40%

Keynote lecture and tutorial sessions – 10%

How will the assessment methods build on the graduate attributes students developed in their previous UoS?

The graduate attributes stressed here emphasise that conceptual knowledge be integrated, that students learn how to simultaneously work both independently and in small groups, that they learn how to face novel (often uncertain) situations, and that they take responsibility for the results and recommendations they produce. The diversity of the assessments (and the weightings chosen) will strongly encourage the development of these graduate attributes.

What is the duration of the final exam?

There will be no final exam.

In most cases we expect students to work in teams to explore the underlying issues, but prepare an individual report for assessment. In addition, with each assessment item, students will be required to complete a peer and self-assessment, during which they quantitatively and qualitatively rated their own contribution and the contributions of their peers during the project.

A satisfactory peer and self assessment includes the following sections:

(i) a short paragraph documenting what contribution(s) the student has made to the project;

(ii) a mark (out of 100) for the students’ technical achieve- ments;

(iii) a mark (out of 100) for each of the other students’, non-technical contributions (e.g. attendance at group meetings, overall preparedness, initiative, team spirit, etc);

(iv) short paragraphs documenting the contributions of the other group members to the project;

(v) a mark (out of 100) for the technical achievements of every other member of the group;

(vi) a mark (out of 100) for the other, non-technical contributions of every other member of the group;

(vii) the students’ signature and date at the bottom of the document.

The numerical scores from these assessments are then factored into the final project mark.
Assessment Feedback: How should students expect to receive feedback in this UoS?
Students will receive written and verbal feedback on their performance in the assignments, as well as upon their participation in class and group exercises.

How will students give feedback on unit of study teaching, learning and other student concerns.
There will be a continuous teaching/learning evaluation that will allow students to voice their concerns during the semester. Students will be encouraged to share their learning approaches with staff and the rest of the student body.
Grading:
Grade Type Description
Standards Based Assessment Final grades in this unit are awarded at levels of HD for High Distinction, DI (previously D) for Distinction, CR for Credit, PS (previously P) for Pass and FA (previously F) for Fail as defined by University of Sydney Assessment Policy. Details of the Assessment Policy are available on the Policies website at http://sydney.edu.au/policies . Standards for grades in individual assessment tasks and the summative method for obtaining a final mark in the unit will be set out in a marking guide supplied by the unit coordinator.

Note that the "Weeks" referred to in this Schedule are those of the official university semester calendar https://web.timetable.usyd.edu.au/calendar.jsp

Week Description
Week 3 Assessment Due: Assignment 1
Week 6 Assessment Due: Assignment 2
Week 9 Assessment Due: Assignment 3
Week 12 Assessment Due: Laboratory

Course Relations

The following is a list of courses which have added this Unit to their structure.

Course Year(s) Offered
Chemical & Biomolecular 2021
Chemical & Biomolecular / Science 2021
Chemical & Biomolecular/Science (Health) 2021
Chemical & Biomolecular Mid-Year 2021
Chemical & Biomolecular/Science (Medical Science Stream) 2021
Master of Engineering 2021
Master of Professional Engineering (Accelerated) (Chemical & Biomolecular) 2021
Master of Professional Engineering (Chemical & Biomolecular) 2021
Master of Professional Engineering (Sustainability and Environmental Engineering) 2021
Chemical & Biomolecular / Arts 2021
Chemical & Biomolecular / Commerce 2021

Course Goals

This unit contributes to the achievement of the following course goals:

Attribute Practiced Assessed
(2) Engineering/ IT Specialisation (Level 4) No 25%
(7) Project and Team Skills (Level 4) No 15%
(8) Professional Effectiveness and Ethical Conduct (Level 4) No 10%
(6) Communication and Inquiry/ Research (Level 5) No 30%
(5) Interdisciplinary, Inclusiveness, Influence (Level 5) No 10%
(3) Problem Solving and Inventiveness (Level 4) No 10%

These goals are selected from Engineering & IT Graduate Outcomes Table 2018 which defines overall goals for courses where this unit is primarily offered. See Engineering & IT Graduate Outcomes Table 2018 for details of the attributes and levels to be developed in the course as a whole. Percentage figures alongside each course goal provide a rough indication of their relative weighting in assessment for this unit. Note that not all goals are necessarily part of assessment. Some may be more about practice activity. See Learning outcomes for details of what is assessed in relation to each goal and Assessment for details of how the outcome is assessed. See Attributes for details of practice provided for each goal.