Note: This unit version is currently under review and is subject to change!

ENGG1800: Introduction to Engineering Disciplines (2019 - Semester 1)

Download UoS Outline

Unit: ENGG1800: Introduction to Engineering Disciplines (6 CP)
Mode: Normal-Day
On Offer: Yes
Level: Junior
Faculty/School: Faculty of Engineering
Unit Coordinator/s: Prof Kent, John
Session options: Semester 1
Versions for this Unit:
Campus: Camperdown/Darlington
Pre-Requisites: None.
Prohibitions: CIVL1900 OR CHNG1108 OR MECH1560 OR AERO1560 OR AMME1960 OR BMET1960 OR MTRX1701 OR ENGG1960.
Brief Handbook Description: This unit gives a brief introduction to a range of specialisations in Engineering including Aeronautical, Biomedical, Chemical, Civil, Mechanical, Electrical and Information Engineering. First-year students have the opportunity to experience aspects of each engineering stream and thus be able to better select which area they wish to pursue in their future studies. There are four Schools in the Faculty and each School will deliver a three-week module covering its specialisations.

School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering.

This module enables students to gain an appreciation of the methods in transforming raw materials to value-added products. Students gain an insight into the application of the basic principles of chemistry, mathematics, material and energy balance in assessing and designing processes, operations and maintenance and safety requirements and procedures. This is achieved through a project based activity that involves a paper-based study of a process followed by construction and testing of performance.

School of Civil Engineering.

Introductory lectures in Engineering Economics and Construction Planning, Foundation Engineering, Structural Engineering, Materials, Environmental Engineering. Each student is involved in the erection and dismantling of several Scaled Model Structures in the Civil Engineering Courtyard. Preliminary lectures related to the models include safety issues, loading, static analysis, foundation calculations, construction management, engineering drawings and detailing, geometric calculations, and survey measurements. Exercises related to these issues are performed before assembly and disassembly of the models.

School of Electrical and Information Engineering.

Overview of Electrical Engineering, Basic circuit analysis: circuits, currents and voltages: Power and Energy; Ohms law, KCL, KVL. Resistive circuits: Resistance in series and parallel; voltage divider and current divider circuits. Introduction to digital systems: Basic logic circuit concepts, Synthesis of logic circuits, Sequential logic circuits. Microcomputers: Computer Organisation, Memory types, Digital process control, assembly language and programming. There are laboratory exercises based on the above topics.

School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering (AMME).

AMME has four degree streams: Aerospace, Mechanical, Biomedical and Mechatronics. Two or three of these streams are covered during this module in any year.

Aeronautical and Mechanical Engineering are closely related. A model wind turbine generating electrical power is tested considering aerodynamic parameters, overall efficiency and mechanical stresses. Mechatronics covers software control of machines, including basic electronic knowledge with examples, concepts of software and hardware integration. Group based activity is to implement a simple mechatronics system onto the wind turbine. Biomedical engineering provides a hands-on design project to develop a joint replacement concept. The design process captures inputs such as joint range of motion considerations, biomaterials selection, manufacturing route, design risk analysis.
Assumed Knowledge: None.
Lecturer/s: Dr Brooker, Graham
Dr Boughton, Philip
Ho, Minh
Dr Bambach, Mike
Dr Sathiakumar, Swamidoss
Dr Thornber, Ben
Timetable: ENGG1800 Timetable
Time Commitment:
# Activity Name Hours per Week Sessions per Week Weeks per Semester
1 Lecture 1.00 1 12
2 Laboratory 3.00 1 12
3 Independent Study 6.00 13
T&L Activities: Laboratory: Students will spend 3 weeks (called a Block) in each of the School of Biomolecular and Chemical Engineering, the School of Civil Engineering, the School of Electrical and Information Engineering, and the School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering. This module will be taught by a few key skills lectures, tutorials and project. In each block students are required to work in teams to explore each of these disciplines and to “put into practice” the concepts learnt through a series of mini projects. Putting into practice, the main components of this module, is an effective extension of learning from theory and tutorials Not only does it provide the students with the opportunity to understand how these concepts are used but their integration in solving real problems and relationship to other aspects of their course.

Independent Study: 6 hrs per week.

Learning outcomes are the key abilities and knowledge that will be assessed in this unit. They are listed according to the course goal supported by each. See Assessment Tab for details how each outcome is assessed.

(7) Project and Team Skills (Level 1)
1. Appreciation of teamwork aspects of engineering work.
(6) Communication and Inquiry/ Research (Level 1)
2. Ability to produce clear, concise written explanations of basic engineering processes and products.
(3) Problem Solving and Inventiveness (Level 1)
3. Ability to use initiative to reach a goal.
Assessment Methods:
# Name Group Weight Due Week Outcomes
1 Laboratory Electrical Engg Yes 25.00 Multiple Weeks 2, 3,
2 Laboratory Chemical Engg Yes 25.00 Multiple Weeks 1, 2, 3,
3 Laboratory Civil Engg Yes 25.00 Multiple Weeks 1, 2, 3,
4 Laboratory AMME Yes 25.00 Multiple Weeks 1, 2, 3,
Assessment Description: The objective of this UoS is for you to participate in and contribute to the laboratory projects. Generally you will work together in small groups. You will be assessed during all laboratory sessions. The mark will be based 50% on the group performance and 50% on individual understanding through quizzes. Each School module is worth 25% of the total. There is no formal examination.
Grading:
Grade Type Description
Standards Based Assessment Final grades in this unit are awarded at levels of HD for High Distinction, DI (previously D) for Distinction, CR for Credit, PS (previously P) for Pass and FA (previously F) for Fail as defined by University of Sydney Assessment Policy. Details of the Assessment Policy are available on the Policies website at http://sydney.edu.au/policies . Standards for grades in individual assessment tasks and the summative method for obtaining a final mark in the unit will be set out in a marking guide supplied by the unit coordinator.
Policies & Procedures: See the policies page of the faculty website at http://sydney.edu.au/engineering/student-policies/ for information regarding university policies and local provisions and procedures within the Faculty of Engineering and Information Technologies.
Prescribed Text/s: Note: Students are expected to have a personal copy of all books listed.
Note on Resources: There is no text book for this course. Notes etc. will be handed out or posted on e-learning Blackboard. Use MyUni to access Blackboard.

Note that the "Weeks" referred to in this Schedule are those of the official university semester calendar https://web.timetable.usyd.edu.au/calendar.jsp

Week Description
Week 1 See Block allocation timetable provided at start of semester.
Week 2 See Block allocation timetable provided at start of semester.
Week 3 See Block allocation timetable provided at start of semester.
Week 4 See Block allocation timetable provided at start of semester.
Week 5 See Block allocation timetable provided at start of semester.
Week 6 See Block allocation timetable provided at start of semester.
Week 7 See Block allocation timetable provided at start of semester.
Week 8 See Block allocation timetable provided at start of semester.
Week 9 See Block allocation timetable provided at start of semester.
Week 10 See Block allocation timetable provided at start of semester.
Week 11 See Block allocation timetable provided at start of semester.
Week 12 See Block allocation timetable provided at start of semester.
Week 13 See Block allocation timetable provided at start of semester.

Course Relations

The following is a list of courses which have added this Unit to their structure.

Course Year(s) Offered
Chemical & Biomolecular (till 2014) 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering / Arts 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering / Commerce 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering / Medical Science 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering / Science 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering / Law 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering / Project Management 2012, 2013, 2014
Civil (till 2014) 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Civil Engineering / Arts 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Civil Engineering / Commerce 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Civil Engineering / Design in Architecture 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Civil Engineering / Medical Science 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Civil Engineering / Project Management 2012, 2013, 2014
Civil Engineering / Science 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Civil (Construction Management) (till 2014) 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Civil (Environmental) (till 2014) 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Civil (Geotechnical) (till 2014) 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Civil Engineering / Law 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Civil (Structures) (till 2014) 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Chemical & Biomolecular 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019
Chemical & Biomolecular / Arts 2015
Chemical & Biomolecular / Commerce 2015
Chemical & Biomolecular / Medical Science 2015
Chemical & Biomolecular / Project Management 2015
Chemical & Biomolecular / Science 2015
Chemical & Biomolecular / Law 2015
Civil 2015
Civil / Arts 2015
Civil / Commerce 2015
Civil / Design in Architecture 2015
Civil / Medical Science 2015
Civil / Project Management 2015
Civil / Science 2015
Civil (Construction Management) 2015
Civil (Environmental) 2015
Civil (Geotechnical) 2015
Civil / Law 2015
Civil (Structures) 2015
Project Engineering and Management (Civil) (till 2012) 2010, 2011, 2012
Project Engineering and Management (Civil) / Arts 2011
Project Engineering and Management (Civil) / Commerce 2010, 2011
Project Engineering and Management (Civil) / Science 2011
Bachelor of Project Management (Civil Engineering Science) 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
Flexible First Year (2016+) 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019
Flexible First Year 2016+ / Arts 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019
Flexible First Year 2016+ / Commerce 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019
Flexible First Year 2016+ / Medical Science 2016, 2017
Flexible First Year 2016+ / Music Studies 2016, 2017
Flexible First Year 2016+ / Project Management 2016, 2017, 2018
Flexible First Year 2016+ / Science 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019
Flexible First Year 2016+ / Science (Health) 2019
Flexible First Year 2016+ / Science (Medical Science Stream) 2018, 2019
Flexible First Year 2016+ / Law 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019
Flexible First Year 2019+ /Project Management 2019
Flexible First Year Program: STREAM A 2015, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Flexible First Year (Stream A) / Arts 2015, 2013, 2014
Flexible First Year (Stream A) / Commerce 2015, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Flexible First Year (Stream A) / Medical Science 2015, 2012, 2013, 2014
Flexible First Year (Stream A) / Project Management 2015
Flexible First Year (Stream A) / Science 2015, 2012, 2013, 2014
Chemical & Biomolecular Mid-Year 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019

Course Goals

This unit contributes to the achievement of the following course goals:

Attribute Practiced Assessed
(7) Project and Team Skills (Level 1) No 25%
(8) Professional Effectiveness and Ethical Conduct (Level 1) No 0%
(6) Communication and Inquiry/ Research (Level 1) No 32.5%
(5) Interdisciplinary, Inclusiveness, Influence (Level 1) No 0%
(3) Problem Solving and Inventiveness (Level 1) No 42.5%
(4) Design (Level 1) No 0%
(1) Maths/ Science Methods and Tools (Level 1) No 0%

These goals are selected from Engineering & IT Graduate Outcomes Table 2018 which defines overall goals for courses where this unit is primarily offered. See Engineering & IT Graduate Outcomes Table 2018 for details of the attributes and levels to be developed in the course as a whole. Percentage figures alongside each course goal provide a rough indication of their relative weighting in assessment for this unit. Note that not all goals are necessarily part of assessment. Some may be more about practice activity. See Learning outcomes for details of what is assessed in relation to each goal and Assessment for details of how the outcome is assessed. See Attributes for details of practice provided for each goal.