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INFO3220: Object Oriented Design (2019 - Semester 1)

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Unit: INFO3220: Object Oriented Design (6 CP)
Mode: Normal-Day
On Offer: Yes
Level: Senior
Faculty/School: School of Computer Science
Unit Coordinator/s: A/Prof Scholz, Bernhard
Session options: Semester 1
Versions for this Unit:
Campus: Camperdown/Darlington
Pre-Requisites: (INFO2110 OR ISYS2110) AND (COMP2129 OR COMP2017).
Prohibitions: SOFT2201 OR SOFT3202.
Brief Handbook Description: This unit will no longer be offered from 2020.

It will be replaced by two units: SOFT2201 (S2) and SOFT3202 (S1).

This unit covers essential design methods and language mechanisms for successful object-oriented design and programming. C++ is used as the implementation language and a special emphasis is placed on those features of C++ that are important for solving real-world problems. Advanced software engineering features, including exceptions and name spaces are thoroughly covered.
Assumed Knowledge: None.
Lecturer/s: Dr McGrane, Martin
Tutor/s: Cameron Hosking (TA)

James Koungoulos

Scott Lill

Martin McGrane

Patrick Nappa

Yixing Zheng
Timetable: INFO3220 Timetable
Time Commitment:
# Activity Name Hours per Week Sessions per Week Weeks per Semester
1 Lecture 2.00 1 13
2 Tutorial 2.00 1 12
3 Independent Study 6.00 1 13
T&L Activities: Tutorial: The tutorial/lab session each week is used to provide some structured learning experiences; they also give students an opportunity to practically explore what they have been learning.

This learning format is extremely important to bridge the gap between theory in Object-Oriented Design and actual implementation techniques.

Independent Study: This includes time spent doing assessment tasks, reading the reference books, trying out ideas on the computer, and planning own work. Students will be given Object-Oriented Design and Implementation assignments. They will put what they have learned in lectures and tutorials into practice and gain practical experiences in Object-Oriented Designing.

Learning outcomes are the key abilities and knowledge that will be assessed in this unit. They are listed according to the course goal supported by each. See Assessment Tab for details how each outcome is assessed.

(4) Design (Level 3)
1. Explain processes and elements in Object-Oriented Design
2. apply Object-Oriented Design approaches to Software design
(2) Engineering/ IT Specialisation (Level 3)
3. Apply Object-Oriented design principles to implementation using C++ programming language.
4. Choose appropriate C++ functions, STL and templates for different software designs and stages in the implementation processes.
5. Explain differences in different types of Object-Oriented programming language and implementation.
Assessment Methods:
# Name Group Weight Due Week Outcomes
1 Weekly Quizzes (Week 3-12) No 10.00 Multiple Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
2 Assignment 1* No 10.00 Week 5 1, 2, 3, 4,
3 Assignment 2* No 15.00 Week 9 2, 3, 4,
4 Assignment 3* No 15.00 Week 13 1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
5 Final Exam No 50.00 Exam Period 1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
Assessment Description: * indicates an assessment tasks which must be repeated if a student misses it due to special considerations.

Assignments are in three stages: the first is from scratch (and straightforward) but in assignments two and three the students are given appropriate previous assignments to extend. This gives the students an excellent experience in working with others` code.

Assignment 1: a project with visual elements using Qt and applying OO Design Principles.

Assignment 2: builds on assignment 1 to add more features, and includes a written analysis of the OO Design Principles used in the received assignment 1.

Assignment 3: builds on assignment 2 to add more features, and includes a written analysis of the OO Design Principles used in the received assignment 2.

Written Quiz: assesses students` understanding of the OO Design concepts and C++ knowledge that was given in the weeks leading up to the quiz. The quiz is conducted in the lab.

Online quizzes will cover the lecture/tutorial of previous week.

Students must obtain 45% in the final exam to pass the unit, regardless of the sum of the individual marks.

There may be statistically defensible moderation when combining the marks from each component to ensure consistency of marking between markers, and alignment of final grades with unit outcomes.
Assessment Feedback: Each assessment is marked by tutors and the unit coordinator. Feedback is given in the form of comments on individual assessments and in the marks.
Grading:
Grade Type Description
Standards Based Assessment Final grades in this unit are awarded at levels of HD for High Distinction, DI (previously D) for Distinction, CR for Credit, PS (previously P) for Pass and FA (previously F) for Fail as defined by University of Sydney Assessment Policy. Details of the Assessment Policy are available on the Policies website at http://sydney.edu.au/policies . Standards for grades in individual assessment tasks and the summative method for obtaining a final mark in the unit will be set out in a marking guide supplied by the unit coordinator.
Minimum Pass Requirement It is a policy of the School of Computer Science that in order to pass this unit, a student must achieve at least 40% in the written examination. For subjects without a final exam, the 40% minimum requirement applies to the corresponding major assessment component specified by the lecturer. A student must also achieve an overall final mark of 50 or more. Any student not meeting these requirements may be given a maximum final mark of no more than 45 regardless of their average.
Policies & Procedures: IMPORTANT: School policy relating to Academic Dishonesty and Plagiarism.

In assessing a piece of submitted work, the School of Computer Science may reproduce it entirely, may provide a copy to another member of faculty, and/or to an external plagiarism checking service or in-house computer program and may also maintain a copy of the assignment for future checking purposes and/or allow an external service to do so.

Other policies

See the policies page of the faculty website at http://sydney.edu.au/engineering/student-policies/ for information regarding university policies and local provisions and procedures within the Faculty of Engineering and Information Technologies.
Prescribed Text/s: Note: Students are expected to have a personal copy of all books listed.
Recommended Reference/s: Note: References are provided for guidance purposes only. Students are advised to consult these books in the university library. Purchase is not required.

Note that the "Weeks" referred to in this Schedule are those of the official university semester calendar https://web.timetable.usyd.edu.au/calendar.jsp

Week Description
Week 1 Lecture: Unit Overview and Administration matters
Lecture: Introduction to C++: a federation of languages
Week 2 Lecture: References and const
Lab: Introduction to C++ and inheritance
Lecture: Classes, constructors and destructors, new and delete
Week 3 Lecture: An introduction to Design Patterns: The Singleton Design Pattern
Lecture: Multiple Inheritance
Lab: GUI coding with QTCreator: A bouncing ball
Week 4 Lecture: The Copy Constructor and Explicit and Implicit Type Conversion
Lecture: Creational Design Patterns Continued: The Prototype and the Builder
Lab: Pointers, Passing By Reference, The Singleton Design Pattern, Const Correctness, and Overcoming const
Week 5 Lecture: Operator Overloading
Lab: Demo of Assignment 1 and The Builder Design Pattern
Assessment Due: Assignment 1*
Week 6 Lecture: Creating Objects using Factories: The Factory Method and Abstract Factory Design Patterns
Lecture: Introducing Structural Design Patterns: The Adaptor, Decorator and Façade Design Patterns
Lab: Operator Overloading and the Copy Constructor
Week 7 Lecture: Introducing the Standard Template Libraries (STL)
Lecture: Decomposition through Structural Design Patterns
Week 8 Lecture: The STL Associative Containers and Introducing the Behavioural Design Patterns
Lecture: Comparing Templated Methods with the Template Method Design Pattern
Lab: Introducing the Adaptor Pattern and the STL
Week 9 Lecture: Writing Templated Classes and Functors
Lab: Writing SOLID code
Assessment Due: Assignment 2*
Week 10 Lecture: The Strategy Design Pattern: how to write your own algorithms
Lecture: The Visitor and State Design Patterns
Lab: The Façade Design Pattern
Week 11 Lecture: Design Patterns working together: The Observer, Flyweight and Smart Pointers
Lecture: Smart Pointers Continued (RAII)
The Visitor Design Pattern
Week 12 Lecture: Controlling how classes interact: The Chain of Responsibility and Mediator Design Patterns
Lecture: The Memento, Command and Interpreter Design Patterns
Lab: The Flyweight and Observer Design Pattern
Week 13 Lecture: Revision and Demos
Lab: Demo of Assignment 3 and Revision
Lecture: Coding for execution speed
Assessment Due: Assignment 3*
Exam Period Assessment Due: Final Exam

Course Relations

The following is a list of courses which have added this Unit to their structure.

Course Year(s) Offered
Bachelor of Computer Science and Technology 2015, 2016, 2017
Bachelor of Computer Science and Technology (Advanced) 2015, 2016, 2017
Bachelor of Computer Science and Technology (Computer Science) 2014 and earlier 2013, 2014, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012
Bachelor of Computer Science and Technology (Computer Science)(Advanced) 2014 and earlier 2013, 2014
Bachelor of Computer Science & Tech. Mid-Year 2016, 2017
Software Mid-Year 2016, 2017
Software 2015, 2016
Software / Arts 2015, 2016
Software / Commerce 2015, 2016
Software / Medical Science 2015, 2016
Software / Music Studies 2016
Software / Project Management 2015, 2016
Software / Science 2015, 2016
Software / Law 2015, 2016
Software Engineering (till 2014) 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Software Engineering / Arts 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Software Engineering / Commerce 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Software Engineering / Medical Science 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Software Engineering / Project Management 2012, 2013, 2014
Software Engineering / Science 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Software Engineering / Law 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Bachelor of Information Technology 2015, 2016, 2017
Bachelor of Information Technology/Bachelor of Arts 2015, 2016, 2017
Bachelor of Information Technology/Bachelor of Commerce 2017, 2015, 2016
Bachelor of Information Technology/Bachelor of Medical Science 2015, 2016, 2017
Bachelor of Information Technology/Bachelor of Science 2015, 2016, 2017
Bachelor of Information Technology (Computer Science) 2014 and earlier 2013, 2014, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012
Information Technology (Computer Science)/Arts 2013, 2014, 2012
Information Technology (Computer Science) / Commerce 2013, 2014, 2012
Information Technology (Computer Science) / Medical Science 2013, 2014, 2012
Information Technology (Computer Science) / Science 2013, 2014, 2012
Information Technology (Computer Science) / Law 2013, 2014, 2012
Bachelor of Information Technology/Bachelor of Laws 2015, 2016, 2017
Bachelor of Computer Science and Technology (Information Systems) 2014 and earlier 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Bachelor of Computer Science and Technology (Information Systems)(Advanced) 2014 and earlier 2013, 2014
Aeronautical Engineering / Science 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Aeronautical Engineering (Space) / Science 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Biomedical Engineering / Science 2013, 2014
Biomedical - Information Technology Major 2013, 2014, 2015
Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering / Science 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Civil Engineering / Science 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Electrical Engineering (Bioelectronics) / Science 2011, 2012
Electrical Engineering / Science 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Electrical Engineering (Computer) / Science 2014
Electrical Engineering (Power) / Science 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Electrical Engineering (Telecommunications) / Science 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Aeronautical / Science 2015, 2016, 2017
Aeronautical (Space) / Science 2015
Biomedical Mid-Year 2016
Biomedical 2016
Biomedical /Science 2015, 2016, 2017
Chemical & Biomolecular / Science 2015
Civil / Science 2015
Electrical / Science 2015
Electrical (Computer) / Science 2015
Electrical (Power) / Science 2015
Electrical (Telecommunications) / Science 2015
Mechanical / Science 2015, 2016, 2017
Mechanical (Space) / Science 2015
Mechatronic / Science 2015, 2016, 2017
Mechatronic (Space) / Science 2015
Mechanical Engineering (Biomedical) / Science 2011, 2012
Mechanical Engineering / Science 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Mechanical Engineering (Space) / Science 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Mechatronic Engineering / Science 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Mechatronic Engineering (Space) / Science 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Project Engineering and Management (Civil) / Science 2011
Bachelor of Information Technology (Information Systems) 2014 and earlier 2012, 2013, 2014
Information Technology (Information Systems)/Arts 2012
Information Technology (Information Systems) / Commerce 2013, 2014
Information Technology (Information Systems) / Medical Science 2013, 2014
Information Technology (Information Systems) / Science 2013, 2014, 2012
Information Technology (Information Systems) / Law 2013, 2014
Flexible First Year (Stream A) / Science 2012

Course Goals

This unit contributes to the achievement of the following course goals:

Attribute Practiced Assessed
(6) Communication and Inquiry/ Research (Level 2) No 0%
(7) Project and Team Skills (Level 2) No 0%
(8) Professional Effectiveness and Ethical Conduct (Level 2) No 0%
(5) Interdisciplinary, Inclusiveness, Influence (Level 3) No 0%
(4) Design (Level 3) No 38%
(2) Engineering/ IT Specialisation (Level 3) No 62%
(3) Problem Solving and Inventiveness (Level 3) No 0%
(1) Maths/ Science Methods and Tools (Level 3) No 0%

These goals are selected from Engineering & IT Graduate Outcomes Table 2018 which defines overall goals for courses where this unit is primarily offered. See Engineering & IT Graduate Outcomes Table 2018 for details of the attributes and levels to be developed in the course as a whole. Percentage figures alongside each course goal provide a rough indication of their relative weighting in assessment for this unit. Note that not all goals are necessarily part of assessment. Some may be more about practice activity. See Learning outcomes for details of what is assessed in relation to each goal and Assessment for details of how the outcome is assessed. See Attributes for details of practice provided for each goal.